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CABI Book Chapter

Consumer psychology of tourism, hospitality and leisure. Volume 2.

Book cover for Consumer psychology of tourism, hospitality and leisure. Volume 2.

Description

This volume focuses on consumer decision making for evaluating choice alternatives in tourism, leisure, and hospitality operations. It deals with research and methodological problems such as coping with nonlinear utility functions, capturing highly emotional product attributes, incorporating noncompensatory decision rules, and accounting for unobserved heterogeneity in a consumer population. The 2...

Metrics

Chapter 4 (Page no: 49)

The impact of seemingly minor methodological changes on estimates of travel and correcting bias.

In 1998, evidence was provided suggesting that an apparent 15% decline in domestic travel estimated from the Canadian Travel Surveys (CTS) of 1994, 1996, and 1997 was possibly misleading. This decline could actually be the result of methodological changes in the survey rather than a change in travel behaviour. Here, realistic assumptions and a simple computational method are utilized to demonstrate that change in bias may account for the drop in estimated trips. The analysis depends on a trip recall salience scale. Use of this scale allows correction for an under-reporting bias arising from reduced trip recall rates for low-salience trips. When the 1996 and 1997 CTS data are corrected, estimates of change in total trips are near zero. This finding corresponds to perceptions within the tourism industry. The bias correction methodology is applicable to other large surveys involving recall of past behaviour in which multiple events are recalled.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Developing operational measures for the components of a destination competitiveness / sustainability model: consumer versus managerial perspectives. Author(s): Ritchie, J. R. B. Crouch, G. I. Hudson, S.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 19) Destination images and consumer confidence in destination attribute ratings. Author(s): Perdue, R. R.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 33) Breaking the rules: cognitive distance, choice sets and long-haul destinations. Author(s): Harrison-Hill, T.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 67) A review of Choice Modelling research in tourism, hospitality and leisure. Author(s): Crouch, G. I. Louviere, J. J.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 87) Qualitative comparative analysis of travel and tourism purchase-consumption systems. Author(s): King, R. L. Woodside, A. G.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 107) Representing and predicting tourist choice behaviour: rule-based vs. utility-based approach. Author(s): Middelkoop, M. van Borgers, A. W. J. Arentze, T. A. Timmermans, H. J. P.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 123) Two means to the same end: hierarchical value maps in tourism - comparing the association pattern technique with direct importance ratings. Author(s): Zins, A. H.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 153) Segmenting travel on the sourcing of information. Author(s): Bieger, T. Laesser, C.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 169) 'Nowhere left to run': a study of value boundaries and segmentation within the backpacker market of New Zealand. Author(s): Ateljevic, I. Doorne, S.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 187) Using Internet technology to request travel information and purchase travel services: a comparison of X'ers, boomers and mature market segments visiting Florida. Author(s): Bonn, M. A. Furr, H. L. Hausman, A.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 195) Which determines our leisure preferences: demographics or personality? Author(s): McGuiggan, R. L.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 215) A new psychographic segmentation method using Jungian MBTI variables in the tourism industry. Author(s): Gountas, J. Y. Gountas, S.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 231) K-means vs. topology representing networks: comparing ease of use for gaining optimal results with reference to data input order. Author(s): Ganglmair, A. Wooliscroft, B.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 243) Behavioural market segmentation using the bagged clustering approach based on binary guest survey data: exploring and visualizing unobserved heterogeneity. Author(s): Dolnicar, S. Leisch, F.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 253) Mastering unobserved heterogeneity in tourist behaviour research. Author(s): Mazanec, J. A.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 273) The consumption of tour routes in cultural landscapes. Author(s): Oliver, T.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 285) Evaluating heritage visitor attractions from the consumer perspective: a focus on Castlefield Urban Heritage Park in Manchester, UK. Author(s): Schofield, P.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 303) A critical review of approaches to measure satisfaction with tourist destinations. Author(s): Kozak, M.
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 321) A review of comparison standards used in service quality and customer satisfaction studies: some emerging issues for hospitality and tourism research. Author(s): Ekinci, Y. Riley, M. Chen, J. S.
Chapter: 21 (Page no: 333) The antecedents and consequences of vacationers' dis/satisfaction: tales from the field. Author(s): Decrop, A.

Chapter details

  • Author Affiliation
  • Auctor Consulting Associates, Ltd., Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
  • Year of Publication
  • 2001
  • ISBN
  • 9780851995359
  • Record Number
  • 20013092663