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CABI Book Chapter

Market development for genetically modified foods.

Book cover for Market development for genetically modified foods.

Description

This book is based on papers presented at the 4th meeting of the International Consortium on Agricultural Biotechnology Research on the 'Economics of Agricultural Biotechnology'. A subset of those papers is included in this volume, which addresses market development issues in developed countries, primarily in Europe and North America. Organized in 4 parts, this volume focuses on consumer reactions...

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Chapter 2 (Page no: 25)

A comparison of consumer attitudes towards GM food in Ireland and the United States: a case study over time.

This study shows that there is a similar level of familiarity with genetically modified (GM) food in Ireland and the USA. The first phase of this research examined 423 randomly selected food purchasers in San Luis Obispo, California, and Galway, Ireland. The second phase examined 459 randomly selected food purchasers in the same locations. Approximately 43% of respondents in both countries indicated that they were familiar with GM food. However, familiar Irish consumers are aware from more sources than the US consumer. Most consumers in both countries indicated that government imposition of mandatory labelling is important, 95% in Ireland and 81% in the USA. A minority of consumers in each country said that they were likely to purchase a GM food product. Familiarity with GM food seems to increase positive attitudes toward it. Attitudes were examined for differences for 2 time periods, 3 months apart (October 1999-January 2000 in the USA, and November 1999-February 2000 in Ireland). Attitudes did not differ between the 2 time periods.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 7) A way forward for Frankenstein foods. Author(s): Burton, M. James, S. Lindner, B. Pluske, J.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 39) Differences in public acceptance between generic and premium branded GM food products: an analytical model. Author(s): Verdurme, A. Gellynck, X. Viaene, J. Verbeke, W.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 49) Is European consumers' refusal of GM food a serious obstacle or a transient fashion? Author(s): Hanf, C. H. Böcker, A.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 55) Estimates of willingness to pay a premium for non-GM foods: a survey. Author(s): Mendenhall, C. A. Evenson, R. E.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 63) A consumer-based approach towards new product development through biotechnology in the agro-food sector. Author(s): Spetsidis, N. M. Schamel, G.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 81) The impact of bovine somatotropin on farm profits. Author(s): Tauer, L. W.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 91) The importance of feed management technologies in the decision to adopt bovine somatotropin: an application to California dairy producers. Author(s): Henriques, I. Butler, L. J.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 101) The potential effect of recombinant bovine somatotropin on world dairying. Author(s): Jarvis, L. S.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 113) Gains to yield-increasing research in the evolving Canadian canola research industry. Author(s): Gray, R. S. Malla, S. Phillips, P. W. B.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 127) Determinants of GMO use: a survey of Iowa maize-soybean farmers' acreage allocation. Author(s): Alexander, C. Fernandez-Cornejo, J. Goodhue, R. E.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 141) Estimating adoption of GMO soybeans and maize: a case study of Ohio, USA. Author(s): Darr, D. A. Chern, W. S.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 159) Ex ante economic assessment of adopting genetically engineered crops in Finland. Author(s): Niemi, J. Virolainen, M.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 167) Biotechnology, farm management and local agricultural development. Author(s): Gorgitano, M. T. Sodano, V.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 179) Public acceptance of and benefits from agricultural biotechnology: a key role for verifiable information. Author(s): Huffman, W. E. Tegene, A.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 191) Science and regulation: assessing the impacts of incomplete institutions and information in the global agricultural biotechnology industry. Author(s): Smyth, S. Phillips, P. W. B.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 205) Quantifying scientific risk communications of agrobiotechnology. Author(s): Marks, L. A. Mooney, S. Kalaitzandonakes, N.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 217) Time series analysis of risk frames in media communication of agrobiotechnology. Author(s): Marks, L. A. Kalaitzandonakes, N. Allison, K. Zakharova, L.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 227) Case study in benefits and risks of agricultural biotechnology: Roundup Ready soybeans. Author(s): Carpenter, J. E. Gianessi, L. P.
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 245) Labelling for GM foods: theory and practice. Author(s): Phillips, P. W. B. McNeill, H.
Chapter: 21 (Page no: 261) Estimating the costs of segregation for non-biotech maize and soybeans. Author(s): Lin, W. W.
Chapter: 22 (Page no: 271) Endogenous demand and optimal product regulation: the case of agricultural biotechnology. Author(s): Artuso, A.
Chapter: 23 (Page no: 279) Tobin's q and the value of agriceutical firms. Author(s): Boland, M.
Chapter: 24 (Page no: 283) The structure of the European agro-food biotechnology industry: are strategic alliances here to stay? Author(s): Traill, W. B. Duffield, C. E.
Chapter: 25 (Page no: 291) Market structure in biotechnology: implications for long-run comparative advantage. Author(s): Lavoie, B. F. Sheldon, I. M.
Chapter: 26 (Page no: 301) Biotechnology in the supply chain: managing a product differentiating technology. Author(s): Weaver, R. D. Kim, T.

Chapter details

  • Author Affiliation
  • Agribusiness Department, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA 93407, USA.
  • Year of Publication
  • 2001
  • ISBN
  • 9780851995731
  • Record Number
  • 20023038256