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CABI Book Chapter

Responsible marine aquaculture.

Book cover for Responsible marine aquaculture.

Description

This book contains 17 chapters. Topics covered are: management of marine aquaculture: the sustainability challenge; marine mammals and aquaculture: conflicts and potential resolutions; recreational fishing and aquaculture: throwing a line into the pond; aquaculture: opportunity of threat to traditional capture fishermen; advances in marine stock enhancement: shifting emphasis to theory and account...

Metrics

Chapter 10 (Page no: 205)

Issues associated with non-indigenous species in marine aquaculture.

Non-indigenous species have long been employed by aquaculturists. In some instances these species had been introduced and become accepted members of the local ecosystem long before they were reared by aquaculturists. Tilapia in Asia are a good example. In other cases, problems associated with the culture of local species led culturists to find related non-indigenous species as alternatives. Examples are the introduction of Latin American shrimp species into the United States and Atlantic salmon, (Salmo salar), to the west coast of North America. The use of non-indigenous species is more widely accepted in association with inland aquaculture than marine aquaculture. A number of diseases, primarily viral in nature, have occurred on shrimp farms around the world. Countries that have used non-indigenous shrimp species have not been immune to the problem, so diseases have been imported along with the shrimp. There is a major concern that these diseases will spread to native populations. The lack of assurance that animals cultured in the marine environment can be contained is a major factor. Escape as a result of culture system failure, vandalism, accidents and carelessness cannot be completely avoided. Concerns that escapees will become established and possibly displace native species have prompted the marine aquaculture community to reconsider the use of non-indigenous species in general and to concentrate on local species.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 21) Management of marine aquaculture: the sustainability challenge. Author(s): DeVoe, M. R. Hodges, C. E.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 45) Marine mammals and aquaculture: conflicts and potential resolutions. Author(s): W├╝rsig, B. Gailey, G. A.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 61) Recreational fishing and aquaculture: throwing a line into the pond. Author(s): Harvey, W. D. McKinney, L. D.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 71) Aquaculture: opportunity or threat to traditional capture fishermen? Author(s): Barnaby, R. Adams, S.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 79) Advances in marine stock enhancement: shifting emphasis to theory and accountability. Author(s): Leber, K. M.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 91) Aquatic polyculture and balanced ecosystem management: new paradigms for seafood production. Author(s): McVey, J. P. Stickney, R. R. Yarish, C. Chopin, T.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 105) The role of marine aquaculture facilities as habitats and ecosystems. Author(s): Costa-Pierce, B. A. Bridger, C. J.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 145) Mangroves and coastal aquaculture. Author(s): Boyd, C. E.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 159) Environmental effects associated with marine netpen waste with emphasis on salmon farming in the pacific northwest. Author(s): Brooks, K. M. Mahnken, C. Nash, C.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 221) Genetic changes in marine aquaculture species and the potential for impacts on natural populations. Author(s): Hershberger, W. K.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 233) What role does genetics play in responsible aquaculture? Author(s): Lester, L. J.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 263) Understanding the interaction of extractive and fed aquaculture using ecosystem modelling. Author(s): Rawson, M. V., Jr. Chen, C. S. Ji, R. B. Zhu MingYuan Wang DaoRu Wang Lu Yarish, c. Sullivan, J. B. Chopin, T. Carmona, R.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 297) Shrimp farm effluents. Author(s): Treece, G. D.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 311) Fish meal: historical uses, production trends and future outlook for sustainable supplies. Author(s): Hardy, R. W. Tacon, A. G. J.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 327) The use of wild-caught juveniles in coastal aquaculture and its application to coral reef fishes. Author(s): Hair, C. Bell, J. Doherty, P.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 355) Contending with criticism: sensible responses in an age of advocacy. Author(s): Tiersch, T. R. Hargreaves, J. A.

Chapter details

  • Author Affiliation
  • Texas Sea Grant College Program, 2700 Earl Rudder Highway South, Suite 1800, College Station, TX 77845, USA.
  • Year of Publication
  • 2002
  • ISBN
  • 9780851996042
  • Record Number
  • 20023099974