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CABI Book Chapter

Responsible marine aquaculture.

Book cover for Responsible marine aquaculture.

Description

This book contains 17 chapters. Topics covered are: management of marine aquaculture: the sustainability challenge; marine mammals and aquaculture: conflicts and potential resolutions; recreational fishing and aquaculture: throwing a line into the pond; aquaculture: opportunity of threat to traditional capture fishermen; advances in marine stock enhancement: shifting emphasis to theory and account...

Metrics

Chapter 5 (Page no: 79)

Advances in marine stock enhancement: shifting emphasis to theory and accountability.

After over a century of use in the United States, marine stock enhancement is still at an early stage of development as a fisheries management tool in coastal environments. The principal constraint to rapid development of enhancement's potential is clear - the rush to use stock enhancement, and use it now, has nearly always led to emphasis on hatchery production at the expense of developing the science of stock enhancement. Until we develop, test and demonstrate a clear predictive capability about the outcome of hatchery release effect, premature conclusions will prevail and continue to hamper the development of stock enhancement as a fishery management tool. Multidisciplinary teams are needed, coupled with an experimental approach and adaptive management to resolve critical uncertainties. Two of the most important uncertainties are 'does stock enhancement increase production' and, if so, 'is this at the expense of wild individuals'? The theoretical background needed to stimulate hypothesis testing has yet to be transferred from related fields, such as aquatic ecology and fisheries economics. Since 1989, development of stock enhancement theory has accelerated, based on several basic hypotheses, which are beginning to appear in scientific papers and symposia discussions. The basic hypotheses are now being tested by several research groups around the world, and the need for a responsible approach to enhancement has been recognized. Within the past decade, several new examples of effective stock enhancement have emerged, along with a cautious optimism about the potential to manage enhancement effectively. However, there remains a compelling need to identify research priorities to help focus global research on the key issues that will resolve critical uncertainties about stock enhancement potential.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 21) Management of marine aquaculture: the sustainability challenge. Author(s): DeVoe, M. R. Hodges, C. E.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 45) Marine mammals and aquaculture: conflicts and potential resolutions. Author(s): W├╝rsig, B. Gailey, G. A.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 61) Recreational fishing and aquaculture: throwing a line into the pond. Author(s): Harvey, W. D. McKinney, L. D.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 71) Aquaculture: opportunity or threat to traditional capture fishermen? Author(s): Barnaby, R. Adams, S.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 91) Aquatic polyculture and balanced ecosystem management: new paradigms for seafood production. Author(s): McVey, J. P. Stickney, R. R. Yarish, C. Chopin, T.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 105) The role of marine aquaculture facilities as habitats and ecosystems. Author(s): Costa-Pierce, B. A. Bridger, C. J.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 145) Mangroves and coastal aquaculture. Author(s): Boyd, C. E.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 159) Environmental effects associated with marine netpen waste with emphasis on salmon farming in the pacific northwest. Author(s): Brooks, K. M. Mahnken, C. Nash, C.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 205) Issues associated with non-indigenous species in marine aquaculture. Author(s): Stickney, R. R.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 221) Genetic changes in marine aquaculture species and the potential for impacts on natural populations. Author(s): Hershberger, W. K.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 233) What role does genetics play in responsible aquaculture? Author(s): Lester, L. J.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 263) Understanding the interaction of extractive and fed aquaculture using ecosystem modelling. Author(s): Rawson, M. V., Jr. Chen, C. S. Ji, R. B. Zhu MingYuan Wang DaoRu Wang Lu Yarish, c. Sullivan, J. B. Chopin, T. Carmona, R.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 297) Shrimp farm effluents. Author(s): Treece, G. D.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 311) Fish meal: historical uses, production trends and future outlook for sustainable supplies. Author(s): Hardy, R. W. Tacon, A. G. J.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 327) The use of wild-caught juveniles in coastal aquaculture and its application to coral reef fishes. Author(s): Hair, C. Bell, J. Doherty, P.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 355) Contending with criticism: sensible responses in an age of advocacy. Author(s): Tiersch, T. R. Hargreaves, J. A.

Chapter details

  • Author Affiliation
  • Center for Fisheries Enhancement, Mote Marine Laboratory, 1600 Ken Thompson Parkway, Sarasota, FL 34236, USA.
  • Year of Publication
  • 2002
  • ISBN
  • 9780851996042
  • Record Number
  • 20023099980