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CABI Book Chapter

Responsible marine aquaculture.

Book cover for Responsible marine aquaculture.

Description

This book contains 17 chapters. Topics covered are: management of marine aquaculture: the sustainability challenge; marine mammals and aquaculture: conflicts and potential resolutions; recreational fishing and aquaculture: throwing a line into the pond; aquaculture: opportunity of threat to traditional capture fishermen; advances in marine stock enhancement: shifting emphasis to theory and account...

Metrics

Chapter 17 (Page no: 355)

Contending with criticism: sensible responses in an age of advocacy.

The modern environmental advocacy emerged in the USA in the 1960s in response to highly visible examples of environmental degradation such as air and water pollution, extinctions of animals and plants, and major ecosystem disruptions caused by logging, mining, dam building and mechanized agriculture. More recently, advocacy has been extended to include global concerns related to the environmental impacts of expanding human populations, widespread poverty, global climate change, and unprecedented losses of biodiversity. The worldwide impact of environmental advocacy groups has increased dramatically in the recent past because of improved methods of communication, widespread media access, and a large infusion of financial resources. For 15 years these groups have criticized specific sectors in aquaculture, but within the past 5 years they have begun to actively target aquaculture as a collective activity. The reasons for this shift in criticism range from legitimate identification of potential problems in aquaculture to fund raising efforts by advocacy groups based on opinion polls of their memberships. Given these current trends, it appears that this criticism will not diminish in the future and has the potential to influence public opinion, consumer behaviour, and the activities of policymakers and regulatory agencies. Given these realities, it is incumbent upon those involved in aquaculture to gain an appreciation of the importance of responding sensibly to criticism. This includes: developing an understanding of the relevant issues; communicating effectively with and through popular media; becoming familiar with the goals and tactics of advocacy groups; and increasing involvement in the formulation of policies and regulations as individuals and representatives of groups.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 21) Management of marine aquaculture: the sustainability challenge. Author(s): DeVoe, M. R. Hodges, C. E.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 45) Marine mammals and aquaculture: conflicts and potential resolutions. Author(s): W├╝rsig, B. Gailey, G. A.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 61) Recreational fishing and aquaculture: throwing a line into the pond. Author(s): Harvey, W. D. McKinney, L. D.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 71) Aquaculture: opportunity or threat to traditional capture fishermen? Author(s): Barnaby, R. Adams, S.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 79) Advances in marine stock enhancement: shifting emphasis to theory and accountability. Author(s): Leber, K. M.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 91) Aquatic polyculture and balanced ecosystem management: new paradigms for seafood production. Author(s): McVey, J. P. Stickney, R. R. Yarish, C. Chopin, T.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 105) The role of marine aquaculture facilities as habitats and ecosystems. Author(s): Costa-Pierce, B. A. Bridger, C. J.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 145) Mangroves and coastal aquaculture. Author(s): Boyd, C. E.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 159) Environmental effects associated with marine netpen waste with emphasis on salmon farming in the pacific northwest. Author(s): Brooks, K. M. Mahnken, C. Nash, C.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 205) Issues associated with non-indigenous species in marine aquaculture. Author(s): Stickney, R. R.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 221) Genetic changes in marine aquaculture species and the potential for impacts on natural populations. Author(s): Hershberger, W. K.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 233) What role does genetics play in responsible aquaculture? Author(s): Lester, L. J.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 263) Understanding the interaction of extractive and fed aquaculture using ecosystem modelling. Author(s): Rawson, M. V., Jr. Chen, C. S. Ji, R. B. Zhu MingYuan Wang DaoRu Wang Lu Yarish, c. Sullivan, J. B. Chopin, T. Carmona, R.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 297) Shrimp farm effluents. Author(s): Treece, G. D.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 311) Fish meal: historical uses, production trends and future outlook for sustainable supplies. Author(s): Hardy, R. W. Tacon, A. G. J.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 327) The use of wild-caught juveniles in coastal aquaculture and its application to coral reef fishes. Author(s): Hair, C. Bell, J. Doherty, P.

Chapter details

  • Author Affiliation
  • Aquaculture Research Station, Louisiana State University, Agricultural Center, Louisiana Agricultural Experiment Station, Baton Rouge, LA 70820, USA.
  • Year of Publication
  • 2002
  • ISBN
  • 9780851996042
  • Record Number
  • 20023100188