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CABI Book Chapter

Integrated natural resource management: linking productivity, the environment and development.

Book cover for Integrated natural resource management: linking productivity, the environment and development.

Description

This book, which contains 15 separately authored chapters, discusses both the principles and applications of an integrated approach to natural resource management. Such an approach must embrace the complexity of systems and redirect research towards the greater inclusion of issues such as participatory approaches, multi-scale analysis and an array of tools for system analysis, information manageme...

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Chapter 6 (Page no: 109)

The question of scale in integrated natural resource management.

Lessons from integrated natural resource management (INRM) practiced at different scales are reviewed, with a focus on catchment management. INRM is complex, and many interactions have to be addressed. Consequently, the scale of investigation can restrict the generality and utility of the findings. Examples from studies in communally managed dryland areas of Zimbabwe show that temporal, biophysical, and institutional scales can each be critical. Contexts and dynamics associated with particular scales, and interactions or lateral flows that become important with increasing scale, also pose serious challenges. A conceptual framework is presented for scaling issues in INRM and how to deal with them. To benefit many people over large areas within sensible time frames requires considerable political will, investment, and strategic planning from the outset. Only then will an enabling environment be created to meet a range of preconditions identified in previous studies of integrated catchment management, watershed development, common property management, and devolution. This paper focuses on the links between the organizational/human aspects and the biophysical/technical perspective of various scaling issues. In particular, there is a need to reconcile current top-down and bottom-up approaches, both of which are needed to achieve effective delivery in structured programs beyond the scale of a few villages or isolated success stories. Options for bridging this gap are discussed and recommendations are made for research that might be undertaken. Action research is recommended to enable learning-by-doing, and should focus at two levels: strategic studies to help create the political and institutional landscapes required for scaling-up; and specific studies of gaps in knowledge, in particular, programmes that account for scale issues. These suggestions are illustrated using the example of groundwater management via nested scales of interdisciplinary research.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Research to integrate productivity enhancement, environmental protection, and human development. Author(s): Sayer, J. A. Campbell, B. M.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 15) Blending "hard" and "soft" science: the "follow-the-technology" approach to catalyzing and evaluating technology change. Author(s): Douthwaite, B. Haan, N. de Manyong, V. M. Keatinge, J. D. H.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 37) Success factors in integrated natural resource management R&D: lessons from practice. Author(s): Hagmann, J. Chuma, E. Murwira, K. Connolly, M. Ficarelli, P. P.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 65) The adaptive decision-making process as a tool for integrated natural resource management: focus, attitudes, and approach. Author(s): Lal, P. Lim-Applegate, H. Scoccimarro, M.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 87) Negotiation support models for integrated natural resource management in tropical forest margins. Author(s): Noordwijk, M. van Tomich, T. P. Verbist, B.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 139) Delivering the goods: scaling out results of natural resource management research. Author(s): Harrington, L. White, J. A. Grace, P. Hodson, D. Hartkamp, A. D. Vaughan, C. Meisner, C.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 157) Adapting science to adaptive managers: spidergrams, belief models, and multi-agent systems modeling. Author(s): Lynam, T. Bousquet, F. Page, C. le d'Aquino, P. Barreteau, O. Chinembiri, F. Mombeshora, B.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 175) Spatial modeling of risk in natural resource management. Author(s): Jones, P. G. Thornton, P. K.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 195) Landcare on the poverty - protection interface in an Asian watershed. Author(s): Garrity, D. P. Amoroso, V. B. Koffa, S. Catacutan, D. Buenavista, G. Fay, P. Dar, W. D.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 211) Integrated natural resource management: approaches and lessons from the Himalaya. Author(s): Saxena, K. G. Rao, K. S. Sen, K. K. Maikhuri, R. K. Semwal, R. L.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 227) Assessing the impact of integrated natural resource management: challenges and experiences. Author(s): Gottret, M. V. White, D.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 247) Assessing viability and sustainability: a systems-based approach for deriving comprehensive indicator sets. Author(s): Bossel, H.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 267) Assessing the performance of natural resource systems. Author(s): Campbell, B. M. Sayer, J. A. Frost, P. Vermeulen, S. Ruiz PĂ©rez, M. Cunningham, A. Prabhu, R.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 293) Integrating research on food and the environment: an exit strategy from the rational fool syndrome in agricultural science. Author(s): Ashby, J. A.