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CABI Book Chapter

Integrated natural resource management: linking productivity, the environment and development.

Book cover for Integrated natural resource management: linking productivity, the environment and development.

Description

This book, which contains 15 separately authored chapters, discusses both the principles and applications of an integrated approach to natural resource management. Such an approach must embrace the complexity of systems and redirect research towards the greater inclusion of issues such as participatory approaches, multi-scale analysis and an array of tools for system analysis, information manageme...

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Chapter 11 (Page no: 211)

Integrated natural resource management: approaches and lessons from the Himalaya.

Losses of forest cover, biodiversity, agricultural productivity, and ecosystem services in the Himalayan mountain region are interlinked problems and threats to the sustainable livelihoods of 115×106 mountain people as well as the inhabitants of the adjoining Indo-gangetic plains. Until the 1970s, environmental conservation, food security, and rural economic development were treated as independent sectors. The poor outcomes of sector-oriented approaches catalysed efforts to address environmental and socioeconomic problems concurrently. The identification of key natural resource management interventions is an important dimension of integrated management. Projects to rehabilitate the degraded lands that cover 40% of the Indian Himalaya could be key interventions provided that they address both socioeconomic and environmental concerns across spatial and temporal scales. However, projects of this type, e.g., investments in conifer plantations on degraded forest lands, have failed because their designs did not take into account the needs of local residents. This study illustrates a case of land rehabilitation in Khaljhuni village, in Uttar Pradesh, India, close to the alpine zone. Vital elements of this project strategy included identifying local perceptions and knowledge and involving the local people in the selection and implementation of the interventions needed to restore the land. Communities were found to be more concerned with the immediate economic benefits from bamboo and medicinal species than the long term benefits of tree planting. The villagers eventually reached a consensus to plant broadleaved multipurpose trees in association with bamboo and medicinal species. Despite assurances that all the economic benefits from rehabilitation would go to the community, the people would not agree to voluntary labour, although they did absorb significant costs by providing social fencing, farmyard manure, and propagules from community forests. Households shared costs and benefits according to traditional norms. The economic benefits to the local people exceeded the rehabilitation cost over the 7-year life of the project. There were significant on-site environmental benefits in terms of improvements in soil fertility, biodiversity, protective cover, and carbon sequestration, and off-site benefits from more productive use of labour, reduced pressure on protected areas, and the introduction of rare and threatened medicinal species onto private farmland.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Research to integrate productivity enhancement, environmental protection, and human development. Author(s): Sayer, J. A. Campbell, B. M.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 15) Blending "hard" and "soft" science: the "follow-the-technology" approach to catalyzing and evaluating technology change. Author(s): Douthwaite, B. Haan, N. de Manyong, V. M. Keatinge, J. D. H.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 37) Success factors in integrated natural resource management R&D: lessons from practice. Author(s): Hagmann, J. Chuma, E. Murwira, K. Connolly, M. Ficarelli, P. P.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 65) The adaptive decision-making process as a tool for integrated natural resource management: focus, attitudes, and approach. Author(s): Lal, P. Lim-Applegate, H. Scoccimarro, M.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 87) Negotiation support models for integrated natural resource management in tropical forest margins. Author(s): Noordwijk, M. van Tomich, T. P. Verbist, B.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 109) The question of scale in integrated natural resource management. Author(s): Lovell, C. Mandondo, A. Moriarty, P.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 139) Delivering the goods: scaling out results of natural resource management research. Author(s): Harrington, L. White, J. A. Grace, P. Hodson, D. Hartkamp, A. D. Vaughan, C. Meisner, C.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 157) Adapting science to adaptive managers: spidergrams, belief models, and multi-agent systems modeling. Author(s): Lynam, T. Bousquet, F. Page, C. le d'Aquino, P. Barreteau, O. Chinembiri, F. Mombeshora, B.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 175) Spatial modeling of risk in natural resource management. Author(s): Jones, P. G. Thornton, P. K.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 195) Landcare on the poverty - protection interface in an Asian watershed. Author(s): Garrity, D. P. Amoroso, V. B. Koffa, S. Catacutan, D. Buenavista, G. Fay, P. Dar, W. D.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 227) Assessing the impact of integrated natural resource management: challenges and experiences. Author(s): Gottret, M. V. White, D.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 247) Assessing viability and sustainability: a systems-based approach for deriving comprehensive indicator sets. Author(s): Bossel, H.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 267) Assessing the performance of natural resource systems. Author(s): Campbell, B. M. Sayer, J. A. Frost, P. Vermeulen, S. Ruiz Pérez, M. Cunningham, A. Prabhu, R.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 293) Integrating research on food and the environment: an exit strategy from the rational fool syndrome in agricultural science. Author(s): Ashby, J. A.