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CABI Book Chapter

Integrated pest management: potential, constraints and challenges.

Book cover for Integrated pest management: potential, constraints and challenges.

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Chapter 10 (Page no: 205)

Integrated pest management in forestry: potential and challenges.

This paper summarizes the events leading to the development of integrated pest management (IPM). Due to the vastness of the subject, only the stages and progression towards IPM in forestry are illustrated by giving examples from Canadian experience. It covers the biological control of forest insects in Canada (mainly parasitoid introductions and work with insect viruses), and illustrates the evolution of IPM with three examples, two involving native species and one involving an introduced species, i.e. the spruce budworm Choristoneura fumiferana (illustrating the transition from the use of chemicals to biological pesticides), the Douglas fir tussock moth Orgyia pseudotsugata (development of the first truly IPM for a defoliator), and the gypsy moth Lymantria dispar (an introduced species that became established in eastern North America, but is still treated as a quarantine pest in western North America). Management of bark beetles, contributions in forest weed and plant pathogen control, and a perspective on the future potentials and challenges of IPM in forestry, exotic insects, decreasing pesticide use, genetic engineering of entomopathogens and transgenic trees are discussed.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Integrated pest management: retrospect and prospect. Author(s): Dhaliwal, G. S. Opender Koul Ramesh Arora
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 21) Cultural practices: springboard to IPM. Author(s): Bajwa, W. I. Kogan, M.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 39) The relevance of modelling in successful implementation of IPM. Author(s): Legg, D. E.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 55) Manipulation of tritrophic interactions for IPM. Author(s): Verkerk, R. H. J.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 73) Behaviour-modifying chemicals: prospects and constraints in IPM. Author(s): Gut, L. J. Stelinski, L. L. Thomson, D. R. Miller, J. R.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 123) Transgenic insecticidal cultivars in integrated pest management: challenges and opportunities. Author(s): Bernal, J. S. Prasifka, J. S├ętamou, M. Heinz, K. M.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 147) Plant resistance against pests: issues and strategies. Author(s): Smith, C. M.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 169) The pesticide paradox in IPM: risk-benefit analysis. Author(s): Guillebeau, P.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 185) Manipulation of host-finding and acceptance behaviours in insects: importance to IPM. Author(s): Cowles, R. S.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 255) Consumer response to IPM: potential and challenges. Author(s): Hollingsworth, C. S. Coli, W. M.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 265) The essential role of IPM in promoting sustainability of agricultural production systems for future generations. Author(s): Cuperus, G. W. Berberet, R. C. Noyes, R. T.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 281) Opportunities and challenges for IPM in developing countries. Author(s): Bergvinson, D.