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Ebooks on agriculture and the applied life sciences from CAB International

CABI Book Chapter

Valuing crop biodiversity: on-farm genetic resources and economic change.

Book cover for Valuing crop biodiversity: on-farm genetic resources and economic change.

Description

In agricultural systems, diversity of crops and varieties is essential to combat the risks farmers face from pests, diseases and variations in climate. Crop biodiversity also underpins the range of dietary needs and services that consumers demand. There is growing concern, however, about declining diversity of crop genetic resources on farms, associated with social and economic change. This book c...

Metrics

Chapter 7 (Page no: 97)

Demand for cultivar attributes and the biodiversity of bananas on farms in Uganda.

This chapter presents an attribute-based model of cultivar demand that is derived within the theoretic framework of the agricultural household. Uganda is one of the largest national producers and consumers of bananas in the world, and is recognized as a second centre of diversity of bananas. Numerous distinct clones of the endemic East African highland bananas are managed by Ugandan farmers, in addition to unimproved, exotic types from South-east Asia and a few recently developed hybrids. High levels of banana cultivar diversity are also observed on individual farms. Reflecting the particular features of the banana plant, cultivar demand is expressed in mat counts and mat shares. A full taxonomy of banana clones is used to construct diversity metrics over mat counts and mat shares allocated to cultivars and use groups. Banana diversity is analysed in terms of two of the three taxonomic levels (cultivars and use groups). Findings underscore the importance of cultivar attributes in explaining the decisions of banana growers in Uganda. Although trade-offs across use groups are revealed when cooking quality and beer quality are considered, production traits are generally more important in explaining cultivar diversity than are consumption attributes. This suggests that maintaining cultivar diversity could be a deliberate strategy for managing abiotic and biotic pressures in this relatively labour-intensive production system with low levels of chemical inputs.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Concepts, metrics and plan of the book. Author(s): Smale, M.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 17) Crop valuation and farmer response to change: implications for in situ conservation of maize in Mexico. Author(s): Dyer, G. A.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 32) Farmer demand for agricultural biodiversity in Hungary's transition economy: a choice experiment approach. Author(s): Birol, E. Kontoleon, A. Smale, M.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 48) An attribute-based index of coffee diversity and implications for on-farm conservation in Ethiopia. Author(s): Wale, E. Mburu, J.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 63) Missing markets, migration and crop biodiversity in the milpa system of Mexico: a household-farm model. Author(s): Dusen, M. E. van
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 78) Explaining the diversity of cereal crops and varieties grown on household farms in the highlands of northern Ethiopia. Author(s): Benin, S. Smale, M. Pender, J.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 119) Explaining farmer demand for agricultural biodiversity in Hungary’s transition economy. Author(s): Birol, E. Smale, M. Gyovai, Á.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 146) Rural development and the diversity of potatoes on farms in Cajamarca, Peru. Author(s): Winters, P. Hintze, L. H. Ortiz, O.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 162) Managing rice biodiversity on farms: the choices of farmers and breeders in Nepal. Author(s): Gauchan, D. Smale, M. Maxted, N. Cole, M.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 177) Determinants of cereal diversity in villages of northern Ethiopia. Author(s): Gebremedhin, B. Smale, M. Pender, J.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 192) Social institutions and seed systems: the diversity of fruits and nuts in Uzbekistan. Author(s): Dusen, M. E. van Dennis, E. Ilyasov, J. Lee, M. Treshkin, S. Smale, M.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 211) Community seed systems and the biodiversity of millet crops in southern India. Author(s): Nagarajan, L. Smale, M.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 233) Seed supply and the on-farm demand for diversity: a case study from eastern Ethiopia. Author(s): Lipper, L. Cavatassi, R. Winters, P.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 251) Institutions, stakeholders and the management of crop biodiversity on Hungarian family farms. Author(s): Bela, G. Balázs, B. Pataki, G.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 270) Cooperatives, wheat diversity and the crop productivity in southern Italy. Author(s): Falco, S. di Perrings, C.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 280) Scope, limitations and future directions. Author(s): Smale, M. Lipper, L. Koundouri, P.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 296) An annotated bibliography of applied economics studies about crop biodiversity in situ (on farms). Author(s): Zambrano, P. Smale, M.

Chapter details

  • Author Affiliation
  • International Food Policy Research Institute, 2033 K Street, NW Washington, DC 20006, USA.
  • Year of Publication
  • 2005
  • ISBN
  • 9780851990835
  • Record Number
  • 20063061436