Cookies on CAB eBooks

Like most websites we use cookies. This is to ensure that we give you the best experience possible.

 

Continuing to use www.cabi.org  means you agree to our use of cookies. If you would like to, you can learn more about the cookies we use.

CAB eBooks

Ebooks on agriculture and the applied life sciences from CAB International

CABI Book Chapter

Multifunctional agriculture: a transition theory perspective.

Book cover for Multifunctional agriculture: a transition theory perspective.

Description

Using a novel approach based on transition theory, this book establishes a link between multifunctionality and debates on the postulated transition towards 'post-productivism' in agriculture. It argues that multifunctionality can best be understood as a spectrum of decision-making bounded by productivist and non-productivist action and thought and this normative assessment of multifunctionality be...

Metrics

Chapter 6 (Page no: 113)

'Post-productivism' or 'non-productivism'?

This chapter critically examines and deconstructs underlying assumptions of the productivist to post-productivist transition model. For all the dimensions seemingly characterizing this transition (agricultural policies, ideology, rural governance, food regimes and agro-commodity chains, agricultural production, farming techniques, and environmental impacts), it is shown that post-productivism has not replaced productivism and that both co-exist temporally, spatially and structurally. It is also argued that, when shorn of its association with the notion of transition, the concept of agricultural productivism continues to be useful, but that continuation of the use of the term 'post-productivism' is untenable. Instead, it is suggested that 'non-productivism' provides a better conceptual term that describes the true opposite of 'productivism' in a temporally non-linear, spatially heterogeneous and globally complex way, and that also acknowledges structure-agency inconsistencies in stakeholder adoption/rejection of productivism. It is argued that productivism and non-productivism constitute extreme ends of a spectrum of agricultural and rural decision-making pathways within which the concept of 'multifunctionality' can be theoretically anchored.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 12) Theorising transition. Author(s): Wilson, G. A.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 21) Transitions: social and natural science debates. Author(s): Wilson, G. A.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 43) Reconceptualising transition: the complexity of transitory systems. Author(s): Wilson, G. A.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 80) Productivist agriculture. Author(s): Wilson, G. A.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 97) Post-productivist agriculture. Author(s): Wilson, G. A.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 179) Contemporary conceptualisations of multifunctionality. Author(s): Wilson, G. A.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 213) (Re)conceptualising multifunctionality. Author(s): Wilson, G. A.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 271) Multifunctional agricultural transitions. Author(s): Wilson, G. A.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 321) Conclusions. Author(s): Wilson, G. A.