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CABI Book Chapter

Introgression from genetically modified plants into wild relatives.

Book cover for Introgression from genetically modified plants into wild relatives.

Description

Introgression is the incorporation of a gene from one organism complex into another as a result of hybridization. A major concern with the use of genetically modified (GM) plants is the unintentional spread of the new genes from cultivated plants to their wild relatives and the subsequent impacts on the ecology of wild plants and their associated flora and fauna. The book reviews these issues, foc...

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Chapter 6 (Page no: 63)

Hybridization between wheat and wild relatives, a European Union research programme.

This contribution is based mainly on ongoing research in an EU Framework 5 research programme. Wheat is a self-compatible, wind-pollinated species whose flowers are often cleistogamous. Crop to crop gene flow is very limited. Field experiments demonstrate that the distance of wheat pollen dispersal resulting in hybrids is usually a few metres. The safe distance to keep intermixing of traits below 0.5% does not seem to exceed 1 m. Crop to wild gene flow has been detected between wheat and Aegilops ovata in the field or in herbarium specimens. Backcrosses and F1 and F2 progeny are known from experimental gardens. However, there is no evidence that hybrids are stabilized in any of the populations observed. Spontaneous amphiploidy could be the main avenue for transferring genes from cultivated durum wheat to wild A. ovata. Artificial hybridization with wheat used as pollen donor can reach higher levels for some species such as A. cylindrica, A. ovata or A. biuncialis, but is generally very low with other wild relatives. Risk assessment of gene escape from wheat should be based on these hybridization limits.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Introduction and the AIGM research project. Author(s): Sweet, J. Nijs, H. C. M. den Bartsch, D.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 7) Hybridization in nature: lessons for the introgression of transgenes into wild relatives. Author(s): Tienderen, P. H. van
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 27) Introgressive hybridization between invasive and native plant species - a case study in the genus Rorippa (Brassicaceae). Author(s): Bleeker, W.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 41) Hybrids between cultivated and wild carrots: a life history. Author(s): Hauser, T. P. Bjørn, G. K. Magnussen, L. Shim SangIn
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 53) Gene exchange between wild and crop in Beta vulgaris: how easy is hybridization and what will happen in later generations? Author(s): Dijk, H. van
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 75) Molecular genetic assessment of the potential for gene escape in strawberry, a model perennial study crop. Author(s): Westman, A. L. Medel, S. Spira, T. P. Rajapakse, S. Tonkyn, D. W. Abbott, A. G.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 89) Gene flow in forest trees: gene migration patterns and landscape modelling of transgene dispersal in hybrid poplar. Author(s): Slavov, G. T. DiFazio, S. P. Strauss, S. H.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 107) Implications for hybridization and introgression between oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and wild turnip (B. rapa) from an agricultural perspective. Author(s): Norris, C. Sweet, J. Parker, J. Law, J.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 125) Asymmetric gene flow and introgression between domesticated and wild populations. Author(s): Papa, R. Gepts, P.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 139) Crop to wild gene flow in rice and its ecological consequences. Author(s): Lu BaoRong Song ZhiPing Chen JiaKuan
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 151) Potential for gene flow from herbicide-resistant GM soybeans to wild soya in the Russian Far East. Author(s): Dorokhov, D. Ignatov, A. Deineko, E. Serjapin, A. Ala, A. Skryabin, K.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 163) Analysis of gene flow in the lettuce crop-weed complex. Author(s): Wiel, C. van de Flavell, A. Syed, N. Antonise, R. Voort, J. R. van der Linden, G. van der
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 173) Introgression of cultivar beet genes to wild beet in the Ukraine. Author(s): Slyvchenko, O. Bartsch, D.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 183) Crop-wild interaction within the Beta vulgaris complex: a comparative analysis of genetic diversity between seabeet and weed beet populations within the French sugarbeet production area. Author(s): Cuguen, J. Arnaud, J. F. Delescluse, M. Viard, F.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 203) Crop-wild interaction within the Beta vulgaris complex: agronomic aspects of weed beet in the Czech Republic. Author(s): Soukup, J. Holec, J.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 219) A protocol for evaluating the ecological risks associated with gene flow from transgenic crops into their wild relatives: the case of cultivated sunflower and wild Helianthus annuus. Author(s): Pilson, D. Snow, A. A. Rieseberg, L. H. Alexander, H. M.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 235) A review on interspecific gene flow from oilseed rape to wild relatives. Author(s): Chèvre, A. M. Ammitzbøll, H. Breckling, B. Dietz-Pfeilstetter, A. Eber, F. Fargue, A. Gomez-Campo, C. Jenczewski, E. Jørgensen, R. Lavigne, C. Meier, M. S. Nijs, H. C. M. den Pascher, K. Seguin-Swartz, G. Sweet, J. Stewart, C. N., Jr. Warwick, S.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 253) Gene introgression and consequences in Brassica. Author(s): Jørgensen, R. B. Ammitzbøll, H. Hansen, L. B. Johannessen, M. Andersen, B. Hauser, T. P.
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 263) Transgene expression and genetic introgression associated with the hybridization of GFP transgenic canola (Brassica napus L.) and wild accessions of bird rape (Brassica rapa L.). Author(s): Halfhill, M. D. Warwick, S. I. Stewart, C. N., Jr.
Chapter: 21 (Page no: 279) Insect-resistant transgenic plants and their environmental impact. Author(s): Hails, R. S. Raymond, B.
Chapter: 22 (Page no: 297) Risk assessment of genetically modified undomesticated plants. Author(s): Wennström, A.
Chapter: 23 (Page no: 309) A tiered approach to risk assessment of virus resistance traits based on studies with wild brassicas in England. Author(s): Pallett, D. W. Thurston, M. I. Edwards, M. L. Naylor, M. Wang Hui Alexander, M. Gray, A. J. Mitchell, E. Raybould, A. F. Walsh, J. A. Cooper, J. I.
Chapter: 24 (Page no: 323) Environmental and agronomic consequences of herbicide-resistant (HR) canola in Canada. Author(s): Warwick, S. I. Beckie, H. J. Simard, M. J. Légère, A. Nair, H. Séguin-Swartz, G.
Chapter: 25 (Page no: 339) Prospects of a hybrid distribution map between GM Brassica napus and wild B. rapa across the UK. Author(s): Wilkinson, M. Elliott, L. Allainguillaume, J. Norris, C. Welters, R. Alexander, M. Cuccato, G. Sweet, J. Shaw, M. Mason, D.
Chapter: 26 (Page no: 351) Potential and limits of modelling to predict the impact of transgenic crops in wild species. Author(s): Lavigne, C. Devaux, C. Deville, A. Garnier, A. Klein, É. K. Lecomte, J. Pivard, S. Gouyon, P. H.
Chapter: 27 (Page no: 365) Introgression of GM plants and the EU guidance note for monitoring. Author(s): Nijs, H. C. M. den Bartsch, D.

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