Cookies on CAB eBooks

Like most websites we use cookies. This is to ensure that we give you the best experience possible.

 

Continuing to use www.cabi.org  means you agree to our use of cookies. If you would like to, you can learn more about the cookies we use.

CAB eBooks

Ebooks on agriculture and the applied life sciences from CAB International

CABI Book Chapter

Environmental impact of genetically modified crops.

Book cover for Environmental impact of genetically modified crops.

Description

This book, containing 20 chapters, addresses the major concerns of scientists, policy makers, environmental lobby groups and the general public regarding the controversial issue on environmental impact (e.g. on soil and water ecology and nontarget organisms) of transgenic crops, from an editorially neutral standpoint. While the main focus is on environmental impact, food safety issues for both hum...

Metrics

Chapter 2 (Page no: 23)

Environmental benefits of genetically modified crops.

Modern agriculture is challenged with an extremely difficult task where it must produce more food to support the expansion of the global population, with less synthetic inputs and without increasing its global footprint. A crucial factor in the expansion of the global population to its current levels was the advances initiated by the development of improved varieties and increased use of fertilizer, irrigation and synthetic pesticides during the Green Revolution. While the ability of pesticides (insecticides and pesticides) to reduce crop losses must be recognized, their potential negative effects on public health, with particular emphasis in developing countries, and the environment cannot be ignored nor allowed to continue unchecked. The response of the agricultural industry in bringing forward new precision farming technology, such as reduced application rates of targeted pesticides with lower toxicity and persistency, has some limited benefit. However, with an increasing world population, a slowing of the rate of crop improvement through conventional breeding and a declining area of land available for food production, there is a need for new technologies to produce more food of improved nutritional value in an environmentally acceptable and sustainable manner. In addition, there is also pressure to ensure that adoption of new techniques will actually benefit our agricultural environment. One answer to these challenges is through the use of genetically modified crops, and it is with a rational and thoughtful introduction of this technology that our agricultural systems can continue to support the global communities for generations to come.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 3) Transgenic crops and their applications for sustainable agriculture and food security. Author(s): Christou, P. Capell, T.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 42) Developing a 21st century view of agriculture and the environment. Author(s): Pimentel, D. Paoletti, M. G.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 61) Environmental risk assessment. Author(s): Tencalla, F. G. Nickson, T. E. Garcia-Alonso, M.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 74) Insect resistance to genetically modified crops. Author(s): Tabashnik, B. E. Carrière, Y.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 101) Resistance management of transgenic insect-resistant crops: ecological factors. Author(s): Raymond, B. Wright, D. J.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 115) Herbicide-tolerant genetically modified crops: resistance management. Author(s): Owen, M. D. K.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 165) Impact of insect-resistant transgenic crops on aboveground non-target arthropods. Author(s): Romeis, J. Meissle, M. Raybould, A. Hellmich, R. L.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 199) Impact of genetically modified crops on pollinators. Author(s): Malone, L. A. Burgess, E. P. J.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 225) Impact of genetically modified crops on soil and water ecology. Author(s): Wheatley, R.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 240) Biodiversity and genetically modified crops. Author(s): Ammann, K.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 265) Potential wider impact: farmland birds. Author(s): Whittingham, M. J.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 278) Safety for human consumption. Author(s): Phipps, R. H.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 296) Biofuels: Jatropha curcas as a novel, non-edible oilseed plant for biodiesel. Author(s): Kohli, A. Raorane, M. Popluechai, S. Kannan, U. Syers, J. K. O'Donnell, A. G.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 327) European commercial genetically modified plantings and field trials. Author(s): Ortego, F. Pons, X. Albajes, R. Castañera, P.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 344) Monitoring Bt resistance in the field: China as a case study. Author(s): He, K. L. Wang, Z. Y. Zhang, Y. J.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 360) Current status of crop biotechnology in Africa. Author(s): George, D.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 383) Agriculture, innovation and environment. Author(s): Ferry, N. Gatehouse, A. M. R.

Chapter details

  • Author Affiliation
  • School of Biology, Institute for Research on Environment and Sustainability, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
  • Year of Publication
  • 2009
  • ISBN
  • 9781845934095
  • Record Number
  • 20093074620