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African smallholders. Food crops, markets and policy.

Book cover for African smallholders. Food crops, markets and policy.

Description

This book investigates how the changed agricultural policy climate affected government policies in the nine countries studied already as part of the preceding project: Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Nigeria, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia. By repeating the cross-sectional survey made in over 100 villages in 2002 and converting it into a panel, it is possible to trace village- and househo...

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Chapter 1 (Page no: 1)

Introduction.

This introductory chapter discusses the objective of the book, underlying research in the previous book and presents the summary and underlying research of each of the chapters of the current book. It also discusses the overall methodology used in gathering data for the study and the core finding of the study. A key theme for the previous book was the Asian Green Revolution and its relevance to Africa. This current book and sequel investigates how the changed agricultural policy climate affected government policies in the nine countries studied in the preceding project: Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Nigeria, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia. By repeating in 2008, the cross-sectional survey made in over 100 villages in 2002 under the first book, it is possible to trace effects of agricultural policies and other macro-level processes on 300-400 smallholders distributed over a number of villages in each of the regions. The study concentrates on the staples and on four major crops: maize, sorghum, rice and cassava. A core finding, repeating what was found in earlier work by the same team, is that African smallholders are producing far below their potential. Ordinary farmers are judged by comparing their yields not with those obtained for a certain crop in research stations but with those obtained by their peers. Comparing yields reached by the top 5% of farmers in a village with those reached by the remaining 95%, findings show yield gaps of 50% and above. The gap may be partly explained by differences in soils and their nutrient contents, by differing water regimes, drainage and other factors, which are possible to manipulate by technology: by soil and water management, by crop selection and breeding, pest management, etc. The study examines what enables and constrains the smallholders in terms of technology, infrastructure and institutional reforms.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 2 (Page no: 23) African agriculture: from crisis to development? Author(s): Holmén, H. Hydén, G.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 45) The millennium goals, the state and macro-level performance - an overview. Author(s): Holmén, H.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 74) Smallholders caught in poverty - flickering signs of agricultural dynamism. Author(s): Jirström, M. Andersson, A. Djurfeldt, G.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 107) A new era for sub-Saharan African agriculture? Changing drivers of maize production. Author(s): Andersson, A. Djurfeldt, G. Holmquist, B. Jirström, M. Nasrin, S.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 138) Maize remittances, market participation and consumption among smallholders in Africa. Author(s): Andersson, A.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 156) Meeting the financial needs of smallholder farmers in Ethiopia. Author(s): Wolday Amha
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 189) Agricultural diversification, food self-sufficiency and food security in Ghana - the role of infrastructure and institutions. Author(s): Dzanku, F. M. Sarpong, D.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 214) Conditions for achieving sustained agricultural intensification in Africa: evidence from Kenya. Author(s): Wambugu, S. K. Karugia, J. T. Oluoch-Kosura, W.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 237) The fertilizer support programme and the millennium development challenge in Zambia: is government a problem solution? Author(s): Haantuba, H. Wamulume, M. Bwalya, R.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 257) Has the Nigerian green revolution veered off track? Author(s): Akande, T. Andersson, A. Djurfeldt, G. Ogundele, F.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 281) Addressing food self-sufficiency in Tanzania: a balancing act of policy coordination. Author(s): Isinika, A. C. Msuya, E. E.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 316) Focusing on the majority - rethinking agricultural development in Mozambique. Author(s): Coughlin, P. E.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 354) Conclusions: what direction for the future of African agriculture? Author(s): Aryeetey, E. Djurfeldt, G. Isinika, A. C.

Chapter details

  • Author Affiliation
  • Department of Sociology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
  • Year of Publication
  • 2011
  • ISBN
  • 9781845937164
  • Record Number
  • 20113005528