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CABI Book Chapter

Potential invasive pests of agricultural crops.

Book cover for Potential invasive pests of agricultural crops.

Description

This book highlights studies on potential invasive pests, focusing on pests from South America, Central America and the islands of the Caribbean basin. These include the Coleopterans, followed by the Lepidopterans. The importance of several dipterans is also treated. Tephritid fruit flies are addressed, as well as a novel method for improved detection of Anastrepha larval infestation in citrus fru...

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Chapter 21 (Page no: 373)

Invasion of exotic arthropods in South America's biodiversity hotspots and agro-production systems.

This chapter presents a study attempting to document the most significant arthropod invasions in mainland South America, with particular emphasis on scales (e.g., Coccidae, Diaspididae and Pseudococcidae). A regional species inventory was developed, based upon (gray) literature revision, and employed niche modelling to visualize the geographical distribution of (potentially) some of the most worrisome species. A broad literature revision was carried out to screen invasive species records in mainland South America. Global (e.g., ISI Web of Knowledge, CAB Abstracts) and regional scientific literature databases (e.g., Scielo) were consulted and queries were formulated for invasive or exotic arthropods. For invasive scales, expert knowledge, e.g., TK, DRM or ALP and specialized databases such as ScaleNet were consulted. Focusing monitoring activities on potential ports of entry could be an effective and relatively low-cost option for early detection of invasive species that enter through cargo or passenger transport.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Biology and management of the red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus. Author(s): Giblin-Davis, R. M. Faleiro, J. R. Jacas, J. A. Peña, J. E. Vidyasagar, P. S. P. V.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 35) Avocado weevils of the genus Heilipus. Author(s): Castañeda-Vildózola, A. Equihua-Martinez, A. Peña, J. E.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 48) Exotic bark and ambrosia beetles in the USA: potential and current invaders. Author(s): Haack, R. A. Rabaglia, R. J.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 75) Diabrotica speciosa: an important soil pest in South America. Author(s): Ávila, C. J. Santana, A. G.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 86) Potential lepidopteran pests associated with avocado fruit in parts of the home range of Persea americana. Author(s): Hoddle, M. S. Parra, J. R. P.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 98) Biology, ecology and management of the South American tomato pinworm, Tuta absoluta. Author(s): Urbaneja, A. Desneux, N. Gabarra, R. Arnó, J. González-Cabrera, J. Mafra Neto, A. Stoltman, L. Pinto, A. de S. Parra, J. R. P.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 126) Tecia solanivora Povolny (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), an invasive pest of potatoes Solanum tuberosum L. in the Northern Andes. Author(s): Carrillo, D. Torrado-Leon, E.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 137) The tomato fruit borer, Neoleucinodes elegantalis (Guenée) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), an insect pest of neotropical Solanaceous fruits. Author(s): Montilla, A. E. D. Solis, M. A. Kondo, T.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 160) Copitarsia spp.: biology and risk posed by potentially invasive lepidoptera from south and central America. Author(s): Gould, J. Simmons, R. Venette, R.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 183) Host range of the nettle caterpillar Darna pallivitta (Moore) (Lepidoptera: Limacodidae) in Hawai'i. Author(s): Hara, A. H. Kishimoto, C. M. Niino-DuPonte, R. Y.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 192) Fruit flies Anastrepha ludens (Loew), A. obliqua (Macquart) and A. grandis (Macquart) (Diptera: Tephritidae): three pestiferous tropical fruit flies that could potentially expand their range to temperate areas. Author(s): Birke, A. Guillén, L. Midgarden, D. Aluja, M.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 214) Bactrocera species that pose a threat to Florida: B. carambolae and B. invadens. Author(s): Malavasi, A. Midgarden, D. Meyer, M. de
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 228) Signature chemicals for detection of Citrus infestation by fruit fly larvae (Diptera: Tephritidae). Author(s): Kendra, P. E. Roda, A. L. Montgomery, W. S. Schnell, E. Q. Niogret, J. Epsky, N. D. Heath, R. R.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 240) Gall midges (Cecidomyiidae) attacking horticultural crops in the Caribbean region and South America. Author(s): Goldsmith, J. Castillo, J. Clarke-Harris, D.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 251) Recent mite invasions in South America. Author(s): Navia, D. Marsaro Júnior, A. L. Gondim Júnior, M. G. C. Mendonça, R. S. de Pereira, P. R. V. da S.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 288) Planococcus minor (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae): bioecology, survey and mitigation strategies. Author(s): Roda, A. Francis, A. Kairo, M. T. K. Culik, M.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 301) The citrus orthezia, Praelongorthezia praelonga (Douglas) (Hemiptera: Ortheziidae), a potential invasive species. Author(s): Kondo, T. Peronti, A. L. Kozár, F. Szita, É.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 320) Potential invasive species of scale insects for the USA and Caribbean Basin. Author(s): Evans, G. A. Dooley, J. W.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 342) Recent adventive scale insects (Hemiptera: Coccoidea) and whiteflies (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) in Florida and the Caribbean region. Author(s): Stocks, I.
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 363) Biology, ecology and control of the Ficus whitefly, Singhiella simplex (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae). Author(s): Legaspi, J. C. Mannion, C. Amalin, D. Legaspi, B. C., Jr.
Chapter: 22 (Page no: 401) Likelihood of dispersal of the armored scale, Aonidiella orientalis (Hemiptera: Diaspididae), to avocado trees from infested fruit discarded on the ground, and observations on spread by handlers. Author(s): Hennessey, M. K. Peña, J. E. Zlotina, M. Santos, K.
Chapter: 23 (Page no: 412) Insect Life Cycle Modelling (ILCYM) software - a new tool for regional and global insect pest risk assessments under current and future climate change scenarios. Author(s): Sporleder, M. Tonnang, H. E. Z. Carhuapoma, P. Gonzales, J. C. Juarez, H. Kroschel, J.

Chapter details

  • Author Affiliation
  • International Center for Tropical Agriculture CIAT, Recta Palmira-Cali, Cali, Valle del Cauca, Colombia.
  • Year of Publication
  • 2013
  • ISBN
  • 9781845938291
  • Record Number
  • 20133231106