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CABI Book Chapter

Amino acids in higher plants.

Book cover for Amino acids in higher plants.

Description

This book, divided into 5 parts, deals with topics on amino acids in higher plants. Part I (enzymes and metabolism) contains 16 chapters pursuing the theme of amino acid metabolism through the driving actions of the principal enzymes, emphasizing recent advances particularly with reference to localization, biophysical characterization and regulation. Part II (dynamics) includes two chapters design...

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Chapter 18 (Page no: 315)

Uptake, transport and redistribution of amino nitrogen in woody plants.

Nitrogen (N) is the main limiting macronutrient for plant growth and N deficits lead to severe negative effects in plant metabolism and development. Hence, knowledge about the complex dynamics of plant N nutrition is essential to comprehend plant functioning in natural and managed ecosystems. The availability of N varies widely among these systems, and this has a significant effect on how successful plants compete with soil microorganisms for available sources of N. It is widely accepted that plants incorporate, transport and recycle inorganic and organic forms of N, including amino-N. Uptake of amino-N can be direct via shuttle mechanisms that transport intact amino acids, but amino-N can also be gained through plant-fungal (i.e. mycorrhizal) or plant-bacterial (i.e. rhizobial) symbioses, yet it can also be lost through parasitism. Regardless of origin, once amino-N has entered the plant root, synthesized amino-N compounds play a key role in long-distance transport of N, metabolism, N storage and the regulation of N uptake. This chapter provides an overview how plants, in particular woody plants, acquire, transport and recycle amino-N. Further, it summarizes our current understanding of why organic N is of varying importance for plant nutrition across biomes and also outlines future directions for research that can help to further complete our understanding of the role of amino-N in ecosystem functioning.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Glutamate dehydrogenase. Author(s): Osuji, G. O. Madu, W. C.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 30) Alanine aminotransferase: amino acid metabolism in higher plants. Author(s): Raychaudhuri, A.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 57) Aspartate aminotransferase. Author(s): Leasure, C. D. He, Z. H.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 68) Tyrosine aminotransferase. Author(s): Hudson, A. O.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 82) An insight into the role and regulation of glutamine synthetase in plants. Author(s): Sengupta-Gopalan, C. Ortega, J. L.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 100) Asparagine synthetase. Author(s): Duff, S. M. G.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 129) Glutamate decarboxylase. Author(s): Molina-Rueda, J. J. Garrido-Aranda, A. Gallardo, F.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 142) L-arginine-dependent nitric oxide synthase activity. Author(s): Corpas, F. J. Río, L. A. del Palma, J. M. Barroso, J. B.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 156) Ornithine: at the crossroads of multiple paths to amino acids and polyamines. Author(s): Majumdar, R. Minocha, R. Minocha, S. C.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 177) Polyamines in plants: biosynthesis from arginine, and metabolic, physiological and stress-response roles. Author(s): Mattoo, A. K. Fatima, T. Upadhyay, R. K. Handa, A. K.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 195) Serine acetyltransferase. Author(s): Watanabe, M. Hubberten, H. M. Saito, K. Hoefgen, R.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 219) Cysteine homeostasis. Author(s): García, I. Romero, L. C. Gotor, C.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 234) Lysine metabolism. Author(s): Medici, L. O. Nazareno, A. C. Gaziola, S. A. Schmidt, D. Azevedo, R. A.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 251) Histidine. Author(s): Ingle, R. A.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 262) Amino acid synthesis under abiotic stress. Author(s): Planchet, E. Limami, A. M.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 277) The central role of glutamate and aspartate in the post-translational control of respiration and nitrogen assimilation in plant cells. Author(s): O'Leary, B. Plaxton, W. C.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 298) Amino acid export in plants. Author(s): Price, M. B. Okumoto, S.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 340) Auxin biosynthesis. Author(s): Chandler, J. W.
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 362) Involvement of tryptophan-pathway-derived secondary metabolism in the defence responses of grasses. Author(s): Ishihara, A. Matsukawa, T. Nomura, T. Sue, M. Oikawa, A. Okazaki, Y. Tebayashi, S.
Chapter: 21 (Page no: 390) Melatonin: synthesis from tryptophan and its role in higher plant. Author(s): Arnao, M. B. Hernández-Ruiz, J.
Chapter: 22 (Page no: 436) Glucosinolate biosynthesis from amino acids. Author(s): Stotz, H. U. Brown, P. D. Tokuhisa, J.
Chapter: 23 (Page no: 448) Natural toxins that affect plant amino acid metabolism. Author(s): Duke, S. O. Dayan, F. E.
Chapter: 24 (Page no: 461) Glyphosate: the fate and toxicology of a herbicidal amino acid derivative. Author(s): Saltmiras, D. A. Farmer, D. R. Mehrsheikh, A. Bleeke, M. S.
Chapter: 25 (Page no: 481) Amino acid analysis of plant products. Author(s): Rutherfurd, S. M.
Chapter: 26 (Page no: 497) Metabolic amino acid availability in foods of plant origin: implications for human and livestock nutrition. Author(s): Levesque, C. L.
Chapter: 27 (Page no: 507) Toxicology of non-protein amino acids. Author(s): D'Mello, J. P. F.
Chapter: 28 (Page no: 538) Delivering innovative solutions and paradigms for a changing environment. Author(s): D'Mello, J. P. F.

Chapter details

  • Author Affiliation
  • Hawkesbury Institute of the Environment, University of Western Sydney, Richmond, New South Wales, Australia.
  • Year of Publication
  • 2015
  • ISBN
  • 9781780642635
  • Record Number
  • 20153121428