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CABI Book Chapter

Amino acids in higher plants.

Book cover for Amino acids in higher plants.

Description

This book, divided into 5 parts, deals with topics on amino acids in higher plants. Part I (enzymes and metabolism) contains 16 chapters pursuing the theme of amino acid metabolism through the driving actions of the principal enzymes, emphasizing recent advances particularly with reference to localization, biophysical characterization and regulation. Part II (dynamics) includes two chapters design...

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Chapter 25 (Page no: 481)

Amino acid analysis of plant products.

Amino acid analysis has been used as a tool in protein chemistry laboratories, where obtaining information about the amino acid composition of a protein is an important step in the characterization of protein structure. Within scientific disciplines such as food and nutrition, amino acid analysis has gained greater importance over the traditional nitrogen determination methods as a means of assessing dietary protein quality. The need to make this assessment is largely due to an increasing recognition that it is the amino acid balance of a food, in relation to the amino acid requirement of the consumer, rather than the amount of protein per se, that is important from a nutritional standpoint. Indeed, amino acid analysis forms the cornerstone of dietary protein quality assessment methods such as the digestible indispensable amino acid score (DIAAS) method which was recently recommended by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) as the preferred method for assessing dietary protein quality (FAO, 2013). The aim of this chapter is to discuss amino acid analysis both in general terms and within the context of plant products. While there are many examples of different types of plant materials for which amino acid analysis is undertaken, the main focus of this review will be on foods and feedstuffs derived from plants.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Glutamate dehydrogenase. Author(s): Osuji, G. O. Madu, W. C.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 30) Alanine aminotransferase: amino acid metabolism in higher plants. Author(s): Raychaudhuri, A.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 57) Aspartate aminotransferase. Author(s): Leasure, C. D. He, Z. H.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 68) Tyrosine aminotransferase. Author(s): Hudson, A. O.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 82) An insight into the role and regulation of glutamine synthetase in plants. Author(s): Sengupta-Gopalan, C. Ortega, J. L.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 100) Asparagine synthetase. Author(s): Duff, S. M. G.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 129) Glutamate decarboxylase. Author(s): Molina-Rueda, J. J. Garrido-Aranda, A. Gallardo, F.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 142) L-arginine-dependent nitric oxide synthase activity. Author(s): Corpas, F. J. Río, L. A. del Palma, J. M. Barroso, J. B.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 156) Ornithine: at the crossroads of multiple paths to amino acids and polyamines. Author(s): Majumdar, R. Minocha, R. Minocha, S. C.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 177) Polyamines in plants: biosynthesis from arginine, and metabolic, physiological and stress-response roles. Author(s): Mattoo, A. K. Fatima, T. Upadhyay, R. K. Handa, A. K.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 195) Serine acetyltransferase. Author(s): Watanabe, M. Hubberten, H. M. Saito, K. Hoefgen, R.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 219) Cysteine homeostasis. Author(s): García, I. Romero, L. C. Gotor, C.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 234) Lysine metabolism. Author(s): Medici, L. O. Nazareno, A. C. Gaziola, S. A. Schmidt, D. Azevedo, R. A.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 251) Histidine. Author(s): Ingle, R. A.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 262) Amino acid synthesis under abiotic stress. Author(s): Planchet, E. Limami, A. M.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 277) The central role of glutamate and aspartate in the post-translational control of respiration and nitrogen assimilation in plant cells. Author(s): O'Leary, B. Plaxton, W. C.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 298) Amino acid export in plants. Author(s): Price, M. B. Okumoto, S.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 315) Uptake, transport and redistribution of amino nitrogen in woody plants. Author(s): Pfautsch, S. Bell, T. L. Gessler, A.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 340) Auxin biosynthesis. Author(s): Chandler, J. W.
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 362) Involvement of tryptophan-pathway-derived secondary metabolism in the defence responses of grasses. Author(s): Ishihara, A. Matsukawa, T. Nomura, T. Sue, M. Oikawa, A. Okazaki, Y. Tebayashi, S.
Chapter: 21 (Page no: 390) Melatonin: synthesis from tryptophan and its role in higher plant. Author(s): Arnao, M. B. Hernández-Ruiz, J.
Chapter: 22 (Page no: 436) Glucosinolate biosynthesis from amino acids. Author(s): Stotz, H. U. Brown, P. D. Tokuhisa, J.
Chapter: 23 (Page no: 448) Natural toxins that affect plant amino acid metabolism. Author(s): Duke, S. O. Dayan, F. E.
Chapter: 24 (Page no: 461) Glyphosate: the fate and toxicology of a herbicidal amino acid derivative. Author(s): Saltmiras, D. A. Farmer, D. R. Mehrsheikh, A. Bleeke, M. S.
Chapter: 26 (Page no: 497) Metabolic amino acid availability in foods of plant origin: implications for human and livestock nutrition. Author(s): Levesque, C. L.
Chapter: 27 (Page no: 507) Toxicology of non-protein amino acids. Author(s): D'Mello, J. P. F.
Chapter: 28 (Page no: 538) Delivering innovative solutions and paradigms for a changing environment. Author(s): D'Mello, J. P. F.

Chapter details

  • Author Affiliation
  • Riddet Institute, Massey University, Private Bag 11222, Palmerston North, New Zealand.
  • Year of Publication
  • 2015
  • ISBN
  • 9781780642635
  • Record Number
  • 20153121435