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Ebooks on agriculture and the applied life sciences from CAB International

CABI Book Chapter

Livestock production and climate change.

Book cover for Livestock production and climate change.

Description

This 395-paged-book aims to raise awareness among scientists, academics, students, livestock farmers and policy makers of the twin inter-related and inter-dependent complex mechanisms of livestock rearing and climate change. The contents are divided into sections: one on livestock production, one on climate change and one on enteric methane amelioration. In the first section, decisive issues such ...

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Chapter 12 (Page no: 183)

Climate change: effects on animal reproduction.

The amounts of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere have been increased as a result of human activity, causing rise in climatic temperature. In recent times, climate has been changing faster than ever; as a result, plants and animals are exposed to more adverse conditions and are finding it difficult to adjust in temperate and tropical regions. The existence of some animals and plants is threatened. Threat to existence is due mostly to low or no reproduction. Photoperiodic action is mediated through the hypothalamus; however, nutrition and stress affect the entire hypothalamus-pituitary and gonadal axis of both male and female systems. The effects are: aberrant gametogenesis, folliculogenesis and ovulation, reduced male and female sexual behaviour, low conception rates, increased embryo and pregnancy loss, delayed post-partum recovery, increased calving intervals, lowered perinatal vigour and increased perinatal mortality and morbidity, etc. These losses are difficult to recognize and diagnose, and the consequence is expensive maintenance of animals with reduced reproductive efficiency. Low productive-reproductive performance of animals after birth is related to the epigenetic changes in the maternal womb due to nutritional deficiency and exposure to stressors. Therefore, animal farming activities are facing, and will continue to face, a tough challenge until some steps are taken to counteract these anticipated damages. Slow adoptive animals would be endangered, as they will face more problems with successful reproduction. It needs a coordinated effort for faster identification of allelic variation of important genes and transfer of adoptive variability to existing animal population by cross-breeding or any other suitable breeding policy. This chapter describes in detail the climatic factors, the mechanisms of their effect and the way forward to counter these effects.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Overview. Author(s): Prasad, C. S. Malik, P. K. Bhatta, R.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 8) Feed resources vis-à-vis livestock and fish productivity in a changing climate. Author(s): Blümmel, M. Haileslassie, A. Herrero, M. Beveridge, M. Phillips, M. Havlik, P.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 25) Strategies for alleviating abiotic stress in livestock. Author(s): Sejian, V. Iqbal Hyder Malik, P. K. Soren, N. M. Mech, A. Mishra, A. Ravindra, J. P.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 61) Nitrogen emissions from animal agricultural systems and strategies to protect the environment. Author(s): Kohn, R. A.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 74) Nutritional strategies for minimizing phosphorus pollution from the livestock industry. Author(s): Ray, P. P. Knowlton, K. F.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 90) Metagenomic approaches in harnessing gut microbial diversity. Author(s): Thulasi, A. Lyju Jose Chandrasekharaiah, M. Rajendran, D. Prasad, C. S.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 100) Proteomics in studying the molecular mechanism of fibre degradation. Author(s): Singh, N. K.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 111) Perspective on livestock-generated GHGs and climate. Author(s): Takahashi, J.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 125) Carbon footprints of food of animal origin. Author(s): Flachowsky, G.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 146) Carbon sequestration and animal-agriculture: relevance and strategies to cope with climate change. Author(s): Devendra, C.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 162) Climate change: impacts on livestock diversity in tropical countries. Author(s): Banik, S. Pankaj, P. K. Naskar, S.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 202) Climate change: impact of meat production. Author(s): Musalia, L. M.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 214) Indigenous livestock resources in a changing climate: Indian perspective. Author(s): Ahlawat, S. P. S. Pushpendra Kumar Kush Shrivastava Sahoo, N. R.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 229) Enteric methane emission: status, mitigation and future challenges - an Indian perspective. Author(s): Raghavendra Bhatta Malik, P. K. Prasad, C. S.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 245) Thermodynamic and kinetic control of methane emissions from ruminants. Author(s): Kohn, R. A.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 263) Ionophores: a tool for improving ruminant production and reducing environmental impact. Author(s): Bell, N. Wickersham, T. Sharma, V. Callaway, T.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 273) Residual feed intake and breeding approaches for enteric methane mitigation. Author(s): Berry, D. P. Lassen, J. Haas, Y. de
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 292) Acetogenesis as an alternative to methanogenesis in the rumen. Author(s): Gagen, E. J. Denman, S. E. McSweeney, C. S.
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 304) Immunization and tannins in livestock enteric methane amelioration. Author(s): Uyeno, Y.
Chapter: 21 (Page no: 318) Phage therapy in livestock methane amelioration. Author(s): Gilbert, R. A. Ouwerkerk, D. Klieve, A. V.
Chapter: 22 (Page no: 336) Feed-based approaches in enteric methane amelioration. Author(s): Malik, P. K. Bhatta, R. Soren, N. M. Sejian, V. Mech, A. Prasad, K. S. Prasad, C. S.
Chapter: 23 (Page no: 360) Methanotrophs in enteric methane mitigation. Author(s): Soren, N. M. Malik, P. K. Sejian, V.
Chapter: 24 (Page no: 376) Summary. Author(s): Malik, P. K. Bhatta, R. Saravanan, M. Baruah, L.