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CABI Book Chapter

Livestock production and climate change.

Book cover for Livestock production and climate change.

Description

This 395-paged-book aims to raise awareness among scientists, academics, students, livestock farmers and policy makers of the twin inter-related and inter-dependent complex mechanisms of livestock rearing and climate change. The contents are divided into sections: one on livestock production, one on climate change and one on enteric methane amelioration. In the first section, decisive issues such ...

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Chapter 13 (Page no: 202)

Climate change: impact of meat production.

Between 1961 and 2009, the world recorded a continued increase in the demand for meat, driven by the fast growth in population, economic improvement, changes in eating habits and rapid urbanization. This has resulted in improved livestock production that is projected to continue even into the future. However, raising animals for food has been identified as a major contributor to climate change. As more meat is produced to satisfy the increasing demand, it is important to understand its effect on climate change, which continues to be a threat to food security. Livestock production contributes 14.5% of the total greenhouse gases (GHGs) that originate directly from the animal in the form of enteric emissions (39%), or indirectly from activities in the meat production value chain like animal feed production and processing (45%), manure decomposition (10%) and slaughter, processing and transportation of animal products (6%). The amount of GHGs emitted in meat production depends on the type of feed and the capability of the animals to digest and utilize feeds, thus minimizing the amount of waste excreted. The production of meat is a very inefficient system where animal proteins require 11 times more fossil fuel compared to plant protein. The efficiency of meat production reduces in the order of fish, poultry, pork and beef. Efficient meat production systems also cut down on the emissions associated with the production of massive feeds. Meat production systems involving ruminant animals and feeding fibrous or poor-quality feeds contribute significantly to enteric emission and manure production, and the inefficiency of feed utilization and meat from these systems has a high GHG effect.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Overview. Author(s): Prasad, C. S. Malik, P. K. Bhatta, R.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 8) Feed resources vis-à-vis livestock and fish productivity in a changing climate. Author(s): Blümmel, M. Haileslassie, A. Herrero, M. Beveridge, M. Phillips, M. Havlik, P.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 25) Strategies for alleviating abiotic stress in livestock. Author(s): Sejian, V. Iqbal Hyder Malik, P. K. Soren, N. M. Mech, A. Mishra, A. Ravindra, J. P.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 61) Nitrogen emissions from animal agricultural systems and strategies to protect the environment. Author(s): Kohn, R. A.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 74) Nutritional strategies for minimizing phosphorus pollution from the livestock industry. Author(s): Ray, P. P. Knowlton, K. F.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 90) Metagenomic approaches in harnessing gut microbial diversity. Author(s): Thulasi, A. Lyju Jose Chandrasekharaiah, M. Rajendran, D. Prasad, C. S.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 100) Proteomics in studying the molecular mechanism of fibre degradation. Author(s): Singh, N. K.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 111) Perspective on livestock-generated GHGs and climate. Author(s): Takahashi, J.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 125) Carbon footprints of food of animal origin. Author(s): Flachowsky, G.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 146) Carbon sequestration and animal-agriculture: relevance and strategies to cope with climate change. Author(s): Devendra, C.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 162) Climate change: impacts on livestock diversity in tropical countries. Author(s): Banik, S. Pankaj, P. K. Naskar, S.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 183) Climate change: effects on animal reproduction. Author(s): Jyotirmoy Ghosh Dhara, S. K. Malik, P. K.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 214) Indigenous livestock resources in a changing climate: Indian perspective. Author(s): Ahlawat, S. P. S. Pushpendra Kumar Kush Shrivastava Sahoo, N. R.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 229) Enteric methane emission: status, mitigation and future challenges - an Indian perspective. Author(s): Raghavendra Bhatta Malik, P. K. Prasad, C. S.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 245) Thermodynamic and kinetic control of methane emissions from ruminants. Author(s): Kohn, R. A.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 263) Ionophores: a tool for improving ruminant production and reducing environmental impact. Author(s): Bell, N. Wickersham, T. Sharma, V. Callaway, T.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 273) Residual feed intake and breeding approaches for enteric methane mitigation. Author(s): Berry, D. P. Lassen, J. Haas, Y. de
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 292) Acetogenesis as an alternative to methanogenesis in the rumen. Author(s): Gagen, E. J. Denman, S. E. McSweeney, C. S.
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 304) Immunization and tannins in livestock enteric methane amelioration. Author(s): Uyeno, Y.
Chapter: 21 (Page no: 318) Phage therapy in livestock methane amelioration. Author(s): Gilbert, R. A. Ouwerkerk, D. Klieve, A. V.
Chapter: 22 (Page no: 336) Feed-based approaches in enteric methane amelioration. Author(s): Malik, P. K. Bhatta, R. Soren, N. M. Sejian, V. Mech, A. Prasad, K. S. Prasad, C. S.
Chapter: 23 (Page no: 360) Methanotrophs in enteric methane mitigation. Author(s): Soren, N. M. Malik, P. K. Sejian, V.
Chapter: 24 (Page no: 376) Summary. Author(s): Malik, P. K. Bhatta, R. Saravanan, M. Baruah, L.

Chapter details

  • Author Affiliation
  • Faculty of Agriculture and Environmental Studies, Chuka University, PO Box 109-60400, Chuka University, Chuka, Kenya.
  • Year of Publication
  • 2015
  • ISBN
  • 9781780644325
  • Record Number
  • 20153123681