Cookies on CAB eBooks

Like most websites we use cookies. This is to ensure that we give you the best experience possible.

 

Continuing to use www.cabi.org  means you agree to our use of cookies. If you would like to, you can learn more about the cookies we use.

CAB eBooks

Ebooks on agriculture and the applied life sciences from CAB International

CABI Book Chapter

Livestock production and climate change.

Book cover for Livestock production and climate change.

Description

This 395-paged-book aims to raise awareness among scientists, academics, students, livestock farmers and policy makers of the twin inter-related and inter-dependent complex mechanisms of livestock rearing and climate change. The contents are divided into sections: one on livestock production, one on climate change and one on enteric methane amelioration. In the first section, decisive issues such ...

Metrics

Chapter 14 (Page no: 214)

Indigenous livestock resources in a changing climate: Indian perspective.

Biological diversity, the variability of life on earth, exists in the form of different species and breeds within the animal kingdom. This diversity is created in the process of molecular/biochemical/metabolic reactions, and acts as a critical measure of adaptation in changing climatic conditions. Indigenous breeds have adapted to climatic variations since time immemorial, and hence have acquired unique traits that make them suitable in given agroclimatic zones; for example, the Indian cattle breeds, Tharparkar and Sahiwal, are heat and tick resistant. Similar cases have also been observed worldwide in Asia, Africa, Europe, Latin America, North America and the south-west Pacific region, having a total of 1144, 1300, 345, 104 and 108 breeds of major livestock species, respectively. Native breeds, namely N'Dama cattle, Red Massai sheep, etc., have developed trypanosomiasis resistance and gastrointestinal nematode tolerance by continuous natural selection. The overwhelming majority of indigenous livestock around the world are bred locally and kept by small-scale livestock keepers; hence, there is a need to promote local indigenous livestock species, as they represent a genetic resource that is relatively resilient to climate variability.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Overview. Author(s): Prasad, C. S. Malik, P. K. Bhatta, R.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 8) Feed resources vis-à-vis livestock and fish productivity in a changing climate. Author(s): Blümmel, M. Haileslassie, A. Herrero, M. Beveridge, M. Phillips, M. Havlik, P.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 25) Strategies for alleviating abiotic stress in livestock. Author(s): Sejian, V. Iqbal Hyder Malik, P. K. Soren, N. M. Mech, A. Mishra, A. Ravindra, J. P.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 61) Nitrogen emissions from animal agricultural systems and strategies to protect the environment. Author(s): Kohn, R. A.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 74) Nutritional strategies for minimizing phosphorus pollution from the livestock industry. Author(s): Ray, P. P. Knowlton, K. F.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 90) Metagenomic approaches in harnessing gut microbial diversity. Author(s): Thulasi, A. Lyju Jose Chandrasekharaiah, M. Rajendran, D. Prasad, C. S.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 100) Proteomics in studying the molecular mechanism of fibre degradation. Author(s): Singh, N. K.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 111) Perspective on livestock-generated GHGs and climate. Author(s): Takahashi, J.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 125) Carbon footprints of food of animal origin. Author(s): Flachowsky, G.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 146) Carbon sequestration and animal-agriculture: relevance and strategies to cope with climate change. Author(s): Devendra, C.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 162) Climate change: impacts on livestock diversity in tropical countries. Author(s): Banik, S. Pankaj, P. K. Naskar, S.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 183) Climate change: effects on animal reproduction. Author(s): Jyotirmoy Ghosh Dhara, S. K. Malik, P. K.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 202) Climate change: impact of meat production. Author(s): Musalia, L. M.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 229) Enteric methane emission: status, mitigation and future challenges - an Indian perspective. Author(s): Raghavendra Bhatta Malik, P. K. Prasad, C. S.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 245) Thermodynamic and kinetic control of methane emissions from ruminants. Author(s): Kohn, R. A.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 263) Ionophores: a tool for improving ruminant production and reducing environmental impact. Author(s): Bell, N. Wickersham, T. Sharma, V. Callaway, T.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 273) Residual feed intake and breeding approaches for enteric methane mitigation. Author(s): Berry, D. P. Lassen, J. Haas, Y. de
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 292) Acetogenesis as an alternative to methanogenesis in the rumen. Author(s): Gagen, E. J. Denman, S. E. McSweeney, C. S.
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 304) Immunization and tannins in livestock enteric methane amelioration. Author(s): Uyeno, Y.
Chapter: 21 (Page no: 318) Phage therapy in livestock methane amelioration. Author(s): Gilbert, R. A. Ouwerkerk, D. Klieve, A. V.
Chapter: 22 (Page no: 336) Feed-based approaches in enteric methane amelioration. Author(s): Malik, P. K. Bhatta, R. Soren, N. M. Sejian, V. Mech, A. Prasad, K. S. Prasad, C. S.
Chapter: 23 (Page no: 360) Methanotrophs in enteric methane mitigation. Author(s): Soren, N. M. Malik, P. K. Sejian, V.
Chapter: 24 (Page no: 376) Summary. Author(s): Malik, P. K. Bhatta, R. Saravanan, M. Baruah, L.