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CABI Book Chapter

Farm-level modelling: techniques, applications and policy.

Book cover for Farm-level modelling: techniques, applications and policy.

Description

The 14 chapters in this book provide an introduction to the techniques used and the issues addressed by farm-level models. They underline the potential that exists to generate new insights and guidance for policy makers as these models come to be more widely used. The book is split into two discrete parts based on loosely defined spatial distinctions. Part 1 concerns itself with assessment at the ...

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Chapter 4 (Page no: 44)

Farm-level modelling, risk and uncertainty.

This chapter reviews whole farm-modelling approaches that attempt to capture: (i) the stochastic nature of the outcomes of farm decision making; (ii) farmers' attitudes to risk; and (iii) ways that risk-averse farmers can manage variability. As an example, a utility efficient programming (UEP), whole-farm modelling approach is employed to address some of the issues that arise from policy reform, in this case, from the fundamental reforms of the CAP in the mid-2000s. In particular, this example explores the expectation that decoupled support payments create an incentive to grow a riskier and less diverse mix of crops and other farm enterprises, and the extent to which policy reform has led to changes in the incentive for farmers to use private methods for managing risk - the diversification of enterprises and use of futures markets.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Policy impact assessment. Author(s): Blanco, M.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 14) Positive mathematical programming. Author(s): Arfini, F. Donati, M. Solazzo, R. Veneziani, M.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 31) Modelling farm-level adaptations under external shocks. Author(s): Shailesh Shrestha Ahmadi, B. V.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 58) Modelling farm-level biosecurity management. Author(s): Rault, A. Hennessy, D. A.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 77) Modelling farm efficiency. Author(s): Gillespie, P. Thorne, F. Hennessy, T. Hynes, S. O'Donoghue, C.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 95) Quantifying agricultural greenhouse gas emissions and identifying cost-effective mitigation measures. Author(s): MacLeod, M. Eory, V.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 112) Moving beyond the farm: representing farms in regional modelling. Author(s): Ding JinXiu McCarl, B. A. Wang WeiWei
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 134) Farm-level microsimulation models. Author(s): O'Donoghue, C.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 147) Scaling up and out: agent-based modelling to include farmer regimes. Author(s): Barnes, A. P. Guillem, E. Murray-Rust, D.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 156) Catchment-level modelling. Author(s): Ferreira, J. G. Abbot, P. Barnes, A. P.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 173) Modelling food supply chains. Author(s): Revoredo-Giha, C.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 189) Linkage of a farm group model to a partial equilibrium model. Author(s): Gocht, A. Ciaian, P. Espinosa, M. Gomez y Paloma, S.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 206) Conclusions: the state-of-the-art of farm modelling and promising directions. Author(s): Heckelei, T.

Chapter details

  • Author Affiliation
  • School of Biosciences, Sutton Bonington Campus, University of Nottingham, Loughborough, Leicestershire, LE12 5RD, UK.
  • Year of Publication
  • 2016
  • ISBN
  • 9781780644288
  • Record Number
  • 20163313836