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CABI Book Chapter

Biocontrol agents: entomopathogenic and slug parasitic nematodes.

Book cover for Biocontrol agents: entomopathogenic and slug parasitic nematodes.

Description

This book contains chapters that capture the full breadth of the basic and applied information on entomopathogenic (EPNs) and slug parasitic nematodes (SPNs) that are used or have potential in the management of insect pests, molluscs and/or other researched targets such as plant parasitic nematodes. The information includes the remarkable developments and latest achievements in this direction. The...

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Chapter 14 (Page no: 289)

Status of entomopathogenic nematodes in integrated pest management strategies in the USA.

This chapter aims to document the uses for entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) in the USA, and to pay special attention to examples where EPNs accomplish something that other pest management strategies do not. The status of integrated pest management (IPM) in the USA is described. The application of EPNS in insect pest management in vegetable crop production (particularly in nursery and glasshouse production of vegetable and ornamental crops), arable crop production, in parks, turfgrass, urban and municipal areas, honeybees, orchard (fruit and nut tree pests), and mushroom cultivation are discussed. The interactions of EPNs with pesticides are described, as well as the non-target effects and effects on threatened and endangered insects. Overall, EPNs are an effective pest control option in many situations in the USA; the limit to the broader utilization of EPNs is driven primarily by their increased cost relative to other chemical or biological options. In that vein, a compelling case for future research is the ability of EPNs to contribute synergistically to other chemical or biological control approaches. Effective examples of this synergism have been reported in both turfgrass (for the control of white grubs, Scarabaeidae) and in greenhouses, nurseries or field settings where the black vine weevil (Otiorhynchus sulcatus) is a threat. Identifying situations where EPNs can contribute to IPM either by providing better control, by providing it at a reduced cost, or by contributing synergistically to existing control options should continue to be a major focus moving forward.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 3) Beneficial nematodes in agroecosystems: a global perspective. Author(s): Askary, T. H. Abd-Elgawad, M. M. M.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 26) Beneficial nematodes and the changing scope of crop protection. Author(s): Coupland, J. Abd-Elgawad, M. M. M. Askary, T. H.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 45) Entomopathogenic nematodes of the families Steinernematidae and Heterorhabditidae: morphology and taxonomy. Author(s): Spiridonov, S. E.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 63) Entomopathogenic nematodes: general biology and behaviour. Author(s): Banu, J. G. Cannayane, I. Meena, K. S.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 88) Entomopathogenic nematodes: ecology, diversity and geographical distribution. Author(s): Hussaini, S. S.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 143) Molecular systematics and phylogenetic reconstruction of Steinernema and Heterorhabditis. Author(s): Luca, F. de Abd-Elgawad, M. M. M.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 157) Efficacy of entomopathogenic nematodes against lepidopteran insect pests. Author(s): Saleh, M. M. E.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 174) Efficacy of entomopathogenic nematodes against coleopteran pests. Author(s): Banu, J. G.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 192) Efficacy of entomopathogenic nematodes against dipteran pests. Author(s): Abdel-Razek, A. S.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 208) Control of stored grain pests by entomopathogenic nematodes. Author(s): Shahina Fayyaz Salma Javed Rumbos, C. I. Athanassiou, C. G.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 223) Toxic secretions of Xenorhabdus and their efficacy against crop insect pests. Author(s): Nazir Javed Muhammad Kamran Huma Abbas
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 231) Toxic secretions of Photorhabdus and their efficacy against crop insect pests. Author(s): Abd-Elgawad, M. M. M.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 261) Entomopathogenic nematodes: mass production, formulation and application. Author(s): Askary, T. H. Ahmad, M. J.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 312) Status of entomopathogenic nematodes in integrated pest management strategies in Canada. Author(s): Yu Qing Sun FengCheng Coupland, J.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 327) Status of entomopathogenic nematodes in integrated pest management strategies in Argentina. Author(s): Fernanda Achinelly, M. Camino, N. Eliceche, D. Salas, A. Rusconi, M.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 348) Status of entomopathogenic nematodes in integrated pest management strategies in Brazil. Author(s): Leite, L. G. Andaló, V. Dolinski, C. Moino Junior, A. Batista, E. Iede, E. T.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 362) Status of entomopathogenic nematodes in integrated pest management strategies in India. Author(s): Sankaranarayanan, C. Askary, T. H.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 383) Status of entomopathogenic nematodes in integrated pest management strategies in Pakistan. Author(s): Shahina Fayyaz Firoza Kazi Khanum, T. A.
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 409) Status of entomopathogenic nematodes in integrated pest management strategies in South Africa. Author(s): Hatting, J. L. Malan, A. P.
Chapter: 21 (Page no: 429) Status of entomopathogenic nematodes in integrated pest management strategies in Italy. Author(s): Tarasco, E. Ragni, A. Curto, G.
Chapter: 22 (Page no: 445) Status of entomopathogenic nematodes in integrated pest management strategies in Poland. Author(s): Kowalska, J.
Chapter: 23 (Page no: 457) Status of entomopathogenic nematodes in integrated pest management strategies in China. Author(s): Wang CongLi Li ChunJie
Chapter: 24 (Page no: 473) Status of entomopathogenic nematodes in integrated pest management strategies in Egypt. Author(s): Abd-Elgawad, M. M. M.
Chapter: 25 (Page no: 505) Genetic improvement of entomopathogenic nematodes for enhanced biological control. Author(s): Baiocchi, T. Abd-Elgawad, M. M. M. Dillman, A. R.
Chapter: 26 (Page no: 518) Breeding entomopathogenic nematodes for enhanced insect pest suppression. Author(s): Subramanian, S. Muthulakshmi, M.
Chapter: 27 (Page no: 533) Slug parasitic nematodes: biology, parasitism, production and application. Author(s): Nermuthacek˜, J. Pudot over˜ža, V.
Chapter: 28 (Page no: 548) The discovery and commercialization of a slug parasitic nematode. Author(s): Glen, D. M. Coupland, J.
Chapter: 29 (Page no: 560) Phasmarhabditis: the slug and snail parasitic nematodes in North America. Author(s): Ley, I. T. de McDonnell, R. Paine, T. D. Ley, P. de
Chapter: 30 (Page no: 581) Compatibility between entomopathogenic nematodes and phytopharmaceuticals. Author(s): Laznik, Ž. Trdan, S.
Chapter: 31 (Page no: 596) Strategies for making entomopathogenic nematodes cost-effective biocontrol agents. Author(s): Nagesh, M. Askary, T. H. Balachander Manohar Arakalagud, S. N. Rajan
Chapter: 32 (Page no: 620) Future thrusts in expanding the use of entomopathogenic and slug parasitic nematodes in agriculture. Author(s): Askary, T. H. Nermuthacek˜, J. Ahmad, M. J. Ganai, M. A.