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CABI Book Chapter

Indigenous knowledge: enhancing its contribution to natural resources management.

Book cover for Indigenous knowledge: enhancing its contribution to natural resources management.

Description

This volume seeks to advance understanding of indigenous knowledge (IK) in the context of natural resource management. The book links theory and practice in providing an overview of the conceptual issues surrounding IK enquiries in the context of their contributions to sustainable agriculture and environmental conservation. Key themes are addressed via case studies from bioculturally diverse regio...

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Chapter 7 (Page no: 75)

Seeds of the devil weed: local knowledge and learning from videos in Mali.

This chapter focuses on indigenous knowledge-informed extension work. It draws on a project in Mali to inform people about how the parasitic 'devil weed' striga reproduces and how to control it, using videos that feature local farmers explaining issues and their experiences. It then follows up on changes that have occurred after people saw the video series, which involved farmers experimenting and modifying their cultivation practices. The ten 'Fighting Striga' videos comprise a set that gives the background biology and ecology to help the farmers understand how control options work and also gives them clues to adapt those options to their local circumstances. The videos use an animation (a technical cartoon) to show how striga seeds germinate and attach themselves to the roots of a cereal crop (or die, if germination is stimulated by a legume, cotton or tobacco crop). An overview and short description of each video is given. All farmers learned from the videos that the battle against striga can only be won when they join forces and apply many technologies together. All of the villages were changed in some ways, either by solving their striga problems, or by changing their organizations, or both. Like farmer field schools, the videos do more than just explain technology. Farmers learn background biological and ecological information, and then use that to conduct their own changes. The main technical changes included: hand pulling of striga; making compost; micro-dosing fertilizer and intercropping with legumes. Organizational changes included: strengthening women's groups; groups adding striga pulling to their repertoire of services and organizing to watch videos.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Indigenous knowledge and natural resources management: an introduction featuring wildlife. Author(s): Sillitoe, P.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 15) The dynamic nature of indigenous agricultural knowledge. An analysis of change among the Baka (Congo Basin) and the Tsimane' (Amazon). Author(s): Reyes García, V. Díaz Reviriego, I. Duda, R. Fernández-Llamazares, Á. Gallois, S. Huditz, S.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 28) Contingency and adaptation over five decades in nuaulu forest-based plant knowledge. Author(s): Ellen, R.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 40) 'Keeping our Milpa': maize production and management of trees by Nahuas of the Sierra de Zongolica, Mexico. Author(s): López Binnqüist, C. Hidalgo Ledesma, R. Panzo Panzo, F.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 51) The contested space that local knowledge occupies: understanding the veterinary knowledges and practices of livestock farmers in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. Author(s): Ainslie, A.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 63) Integrating indigenous knowledge for technology adoption in agriculture. Author(s): Palis, F. G.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 86) 'I will continue to fight them': local knowledge, everyday resistance and adaptation to climate change in semi-arid Tanzania. Author(s): Naess, L. O.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 99) Indigenous soil enrichment for food security and climate change in Africa and Asia: a review. Author(s): Fairhead, J. Fraser, J. Amanor, K. Solomon, D. Lehmann, J. Leach, M.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 116) Will the real raised-field agriculture please rise? Indigenous knowledge and the resolution of competing visions of one way to farm wetlands. Author(s): McKey, D. Renard, D. Comptour, M.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 130) Andean cultural affirmation and cultural integration in context: reflections on indigenous knowledge for the in situ conservation of agrobiodiversity. Author(s): Shepherd, C.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 147) The indigenous knowledge of crop diversity and evolution. Author(s): Brush, S. B.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 158) Investigating farmers' knowledge and practice regarding crop seeds: beware your assumptions! Author(s): Soleri, D. Cleveland, D. A.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 174) Traditional domestic knowledge and skills in post-harvest processes: a focus on food crop storage. Author(s): Howard, P. L.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 190) The local wisdom of Balinese subaks. Author(s): Windia, W. Sedana, G. Vet, T. de Lansing, J. S.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 203) Indigenous agriculture and the politics of knowledge. Author(s): Keleman-Saxena, A. Brock, S. Cortesi, L. Hebdon, C. Johnson, A. Ludlow, F. M. Dove, M. R.