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Ebooks on agriculture and the applied life sciences from CAB International

CABI Book Chapter

Planetary health: human health in an era of global environmental change.

Book cover for Planetary health: human health in an era of global environmental change.

Description

Planetary Health - the idea that human health and the health of the environment are inextricably linked - encourages the preservation and sustainability of natural systems for the benefit of human health. Drawing from disciplines such as public health, environmental science, evolutionary anthropology, welfare economics, geography, policy and organizational theory, it addresses the challenges of th...

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Chapter 13 (Page no: 87)

Energy use, greenhouse gas emissions and global warming.

This chapter focuses on another main pathway through which global environmental change has impacted human and environmental health: our use of energy, particularly when produced from non-renewable, carbon-based fuel sources. It presents historical data showing the increasing rates of energy use over the years, and discusses the effects of urbanization and population growth on energy use. Energy use is the key driver of climate change. The energy sector alone is responsible for two-thirds of all global carbon dioxide emissions, and thus its use leads to increased land, water and air temperatures, heat stress, more severe weather events and ocean acidification. Depending on the energy source, its use can also release toxic materials into the environment. The impacts on human health are not always straightforward, however. Energy has many benefits: it generates electricity to power heating, stoves and refrigerators, homes and hospitals, factories and schools. It provides heat and light, fuel for transport and power for manufacturing.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Introduction to planetary health. Author(s): Cole, J.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 9) Key concepts in planetary health. Author(s): Cole, J.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 23) The evolutionary biology approach: a natural baseline for human health. Author(s): Cole, J.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 29) The natural capital approach: opportunities and challenges. Author(s): Farlow, A.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 35) The one earth approach: planetary health in an era of limits. Author(s): Quilley, S. Zywert, K.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 42) The transhuman approach: technoscience and nature. Author(s): Foster, A.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 48) Trends in human health. Author(s): Cole, J.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 54) The demographic transition. Author(s): Cole, J.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 58) The epidemiological transition. Author(s): Cole, J.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 65) The ecological transition. Author(s): Cole, J.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 69) Agriculture: land use, food systems and biodiversity. Author(s): Cole, J.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 81) Urbanization, living standards and sustainability. Author(s): Cole, J.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 98) Environmental protection: a key tool for planetary health. Author(s): Cole, J.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 108) Conclusions: equity, distribution and planetary health. Author(s): Cole, J.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 113) Climate change, land use and waterborne infectious disease. Author(s): Messina, J.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 119) Sanitation, clean energy and fertilizer. Author(s): Cole, J.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 125) Trees, well-being and urban greening. Author(s): Milner, A. Harris, T.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 131) Livestock, antibiotics and greenhouse gas emissions. Author(s): Bartlett, H.