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Organic food systems meeting the needs of Southern Africa.

Book cover for Organic food systems meeting the needs of Southern Africa.

Description

This book reports on long-term comparative organic farming systems' research trials carried out over the last 5 years in the Southern Cape of South Africa, as well as research into the successes and failures of the organic sector and the technical tools required for sustainable development in South Africa, Zambia, Uganda and Tanzania. It includes 24 chapters organized into 4 parts. Part 1 (Chapter...

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Chapter 3 (Page no: 32)

Organic research contributes to sector development and good organic policy: the Danish, Swiss, American and African case studies.

Research in ten countries (in Africa, America and Europe) has shown that organic research promotes evidence-based policy development. A seven countries study by the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) (2008) on how governments can assist organic sectors, provided guidelines about: (i) regulation; (ii) special support for small-scale farmers; and (iii) underpinning the emergence of a market for organic produce without distorting this market. Eight years later, UNCTAD published a further report on financing organic agriculture (OA) in Africa, which concluded that lack of finance hinders the development of OA in Africa. These reports emphasize the need for OA research and this chapter analyses three long-term research projects. The Swiss long-term research trials showed many benefits of organic farming, but also limitations, with yields 20% lower than conventional farming; they cite many researchers around the world who show the benefits of OA, and argue for the establishment of a global platform for organic farming research, innovation and technology transfer. Long-term research has had a major impact on production, processing, marketing and consumption of organic produce worldwide, as shown by Danish research through four research programmes at Aarhus University (which contributed to sales of organic produce increasing from US$80 million in 1996 to US$821 million in 2010), and this assisted many Danish farmers to expand production and understand the needs of the market. Danish policy makers took note and formulated more supportive organic farming policies. In the USA, the Rodale Institute in Pennsylvania carried out long-term research trials to show that OA can be economically competitive, while benefiting the environment and the health of consumers; they showed that in dry years, organic crops outyield conventional crops. All three studies had close links with agricultural policy, but the Danish and Swiss studies were more sympathetically received and resulted directly in positive changes to agricultural policies in those countries.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 3) The developing organic sector in Southern and Eastern Africa: what have we learned about sustainable development? Author(s): Auerbach, R.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 21) An overview of global organic and regenerative agriculture movements. Author(s): Leu, A.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 42) The Organic Academy of IFOAM-Organics International: training multipliers in the developing world. Author(s): Hauptfleisch, K.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 51) Understanding a food systems approach. Author(s): Strassner, C. Kahl, J.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 60) BERAS - a global network of food systems with examples from Sweden, Haiti, Tanzania and India. Author(s): Hertwig, J.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 81) The likely impact of the 2015-2018 drought in South Africa: lessons from the 2008 food price crisis and future implications. Author(s): Auerbach, R. Piek, H. Battersby, J. Devereux, S. Olivier, N.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 100) The use of participatory rural appraisal (PRA) to support organic food systems in Africa. Author(s): Auerbach, R.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 113) Strengthening participation in the organic value chain for small-scale farmers in Southern KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Author(s): Troosters, W. Auerbach, R. Haysom, G.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 130) Participatory Guarantee Systems as an organic market entry point for small-scale farmers in South Africa. Author(s): Mashele, N. J. Auerbach, R.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 139) Development of an inclusive value chain for peri-urban micro-farmers. Author(s): Purkis, M.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 151) Supporting vulnerable communities in the Eastern Cape: assessing the rainfall evidence. Author(s): Auerbach, R.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 176) Water efficiency, energy efficiency and suburban vegetable production. Author(s): Auerbach, R. Caude, A.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 185) Experiential training of farmers and university diploma students in KwaZulu-Natal and the Southern Cape. Author(s): Auerbach, R.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 199) The National Organic Agriculture Movement of Uganda. Author(s): Nalunga, J. Auerbach, R. Ssekyewa, C.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 209) Factors contributing to adoption or disadoption of organic agriculture in Zambia. Author(s): Munthali, R. Auerbach, R. Mataa, M.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 217) The rapid incineration field test as an accurate, cost-effective and practical tool for estimating soil carbon in Africa. Author(s): Ackhurst, A. Auerbach, R. Louw, J.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 233) The Nelson Mandela long-term comparative organic farming systems research trials: baseline study and trial design. Author(s): Auerbach, R. Mashele, N. J. Eckert, C.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 250) Comparative water use efficiency and water retention in the Mandela trials. Author(s): Eckert, C. Auerbach, R. Lorentz, S.
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 264) Biological and chemical soil fumigation and pest and disease management comparisons in the Western Cape. Author(s): Niekerk, A. van Auerbach, R. Lamprecht, S.
Chapter: 21 (Page no: 284) Initial assessment of selected biological soil health indicators in organic versus conventional cropping systems in field trials in South Africa. Author(s): Sibiya, M. Habig, J. Storey, S. Labuschagne, N.
Chapter: 22 (Page no: 303) Soil fertility changes and crop yields from the first 4 years of the Mandela trials. Author(s): Swanepoel, M. Auerbach, R. Mashele, N. J.
Chapter: 23 (Page no: 327) Urban agriculture: challenges and opportunities in urban water management and planning. Author(s): Wesselow, M. Kifunda, C. Auerbach, R. Siebenhüner, B.
Chapter: 24 (Page no: 337) A future strategy for organic development in Southern Africa. Author(s): Auerbach, R. Purkis, M.