Cookies on CAB eBooks

Like most websites we use cookies. This is to ensure that we give you the best experience possible.

 

Continuing to use www.cabi.org  means you agree to our use of cookies. If you would like to, you can learn more about the cookies we use.

CAB eBooks

Ebooks on agriculture and the applied life sciences from CAB International

CABI Book Chapter

Climate change impacts and sustainability: ecosystems of Tanzania.

Book cover for Climate change impacts and sustainability: ecosystems of Tanzania.

Description

This book presents the current state of research at the University of Dar es Salaam linking climate change and ecosystems' integrity in the tropics with particular focus on Tanzania. The focus of the book is on the implications of climate change on various aspects of economic endeavour - from agropastoralism, wetland management to weather forecasting. The analyses concentrate on the potential impa...

Metrics

Chapter 12 (Page no: 194)

Community livelihoods and ecosystem integrity in makere forest reserve, western Tanzania.

Wealth creation and poverty alleviation processes in the forest-bounded areas entail the use of such forests to a greater extent. Studies elsewhere show that there is often a tendency to use such forests until they are depleted before technology comes in to improve livelihoods. In this chapter, we examine community livelihoods in relation to ecosystem integrity for communities surrounding the Makere Forest Reserve, particularly socio-economic characteristics of communities, their links to forest utilization and implications for ecosystem integrity. We used mixed methods to collect data: (i) a household questionnaire; (ii) focus group discussions; (iii) key informant interviews; and (iv) a literature review, backed up with satellite imagery. Quantitative and qualitative data collected were subjected to statistical and non-statistical tests, respectively, with the use of Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) computer software for quantitative data analysis. Livelihood activities in the area include shifting cultivation, livestock keeping, firewood fetching, charcoal making, harvesting timber and illegal logging. The motive for such forest exploitation is both for meeting household needs as well as for wealth accumulation. Forest users take part in such activities regardless of the distance they have to travel from their villages to come to the forest areas. We found education is an integral part of wealth status, but had nothing to do in terms of improving livelihood activities for ecosystem integrity. The absence of livelihood diversification of farm-related activities penetrates into weak forest governance strategies resulting in proliferation of deforestation and forest degradation. To maintain forest integrity, integrated approaches in forest management and alternative livelihood activities are needed such as beekeeping, fishing and modernized livestock keeping. These activities have the potential to increase household food and income and alleviate poverty levels without compromising ecosystem integrity.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Introduction. Author(s): Mung'ong'o, C. G. Yanda, P. Z. Mabhuye, E. B.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 9) Living and responding to climate variability and change among coffee and banana farmers in the highlands of Moshi rural district, Tanzania. Author(s): Temba, P. L. Pauline, N. M. Ndaki, P. M.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 23) Cassava as an adaptation crop to climate variability and change in coastal areas of Tanzania: a case of the Mkuranga district. Author(s): Mbwambo, N. A. Liwenga, E. T.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 34) Agroecosystems' resilience and social-ecological vulnerability index to climate change in Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. Author(s): Shirima, K. C. Mung'ong'o, C. G.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 44) Effects of conservation agriculture on farmers' livelihoods in the face of climate change in Balaka district, Malawi. Author(s): Zimba, J. M. Liwenga, E. T.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 59) A comparative cost-benefit analysis of mobile and sedentary pastoral production systems in selected villages in Northern Tanzania. Author(s): Yamat, L. E. Mung'ong'o, C. G.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 101) Locally based responses to impacts of climate change in pastoral landscapes of Northern Tanzania. Author(s): Mabhuye, E. B. Yanda, P. Z.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 122) Assessment of socio-ecological resilience of agropastoralists to climate change and variability impacts in Bariadi district, Tanzania. Author(s): Cyrilo, E. Mung'ong'o, C. G.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 153) Natural resource use conflicts in a changing climate: The case of the wetlands of Kilombero and Kilosa districts in Tanzania. Author(s): Liwenga, E. T. Silangwa, F.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 169) The role of ecosystem services in enhancing climate change resilience of local communities: the case of Ngarambe-Tapika Wildlife Management Area, Rufiji district, Tanzania. Author(s): Katondo, R. J. M. Nyomora, A. M. S.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 180) Effectiveness of existing climate smart agricultural practices in Tehuledere district, north-eastern Ethiopia. Author(s): Wassie, A. S. Pauline, N. M.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 217) Weather forecasting and communication in the upper Great Ruaha catchment area. Author(s): Mwajombe, A. R. Lema, G. A.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 237) Lessons learnt and the way forward for research on climate change in Tanzania. Author(s): Yanda, P. Z. Mung'ong'o, C. G. Mabhuye, E. B.